Tuesday, November 13, 2007

[ To all in the Textile Industry - In or Retd & Consulting.]

Who links to me?
You are welcome to advertise in my blog. Your advice on my blog will be highly appreciated. Kindly leave your e-mail so I can thank you.
You can get a Masters degree in"Technical Textile" at Manchester University.
What is Gore fabric do you know.
How is Bluetooth technology applied and in which textiles.
Which are the parts of your shirt having a powder coating.
World Heritage site "PORTO" is in............
World leader in engineered knitted wear is..............
Who manufactures space suits
What is electro spinning?.
Chemical resistance - Geo textiles is manufactured from which fiber?.

CSIRO. The Commonwealth Scientific and textile Initialization is using its textile,biochemical and materials research expertise to design textiles that prevent wounds and promote healing.CSIRO is developing yarn and textile production methods for a new generation of electronic textiles.These yarns and textiles will be based 'inherently on conductive polymers'.Electronic functionality will be seamlessly integrated in to the materials. href="http://www.blogger.com/Enquires@csiro.au.Enquiries@csiro.au
Reduced risk of Surgical infection.

B.Braun Medical.a part of Germany based B.Braun group,has launched an implantable product that it claims can reduce the risk of infection after treatment for vascular disease.
E - Tags.
what the heck is that ?.
It is a Project at VIRGINIA TECH.
e-textile buttons They are small computational,sensors or actuator devices which attach to a fabric.
e - textiles.
The research involves building physical devices,finding ways to attach them to fabric,finding ways to connect wires in the fabric,and development of software and protocols for communication and control of the devices.

E - broidery ( it is a project )

Department Researchers Design E-textiles for Computerized Clothing & Military Applications. A section of an e-textile interwoven with electronic components. A 30-foot prototype was built for a military sensing project. Mark Jones and Tom Martin have been awarded two contracts to design e-textiles—cloth interwoven with electronics. They have received an NSF Information Technology Research (ITR) grant to design wearable computers made of e-textiles and a Defense Advance Research Projects Agency (DARPA) contract to develop e-textile fabrics for military sensing and communications. When Tent Walls Can Talk. For the DARPA project, Jones and Martin are working with colleagues at the University of Southern California’s Information Sciences Institute (ISI). Called STRETCH, the project is aimed at developing large e-textile fabrics that look like typical military equipment, such as tents or camouflage nets, but with electronic wires and sensors woven into the fabric, for sensing and communications. Data from the electronics will be translated by software into images that will enable users to fix the location of detected sounds. “The goal of the project is to develop a low-cost, flexibly deployable e-textile system that has low power requirements and doesn’t rely on radio waves,” said Jones. RF communication can alert an adversary to a military unit’s location. In addition to sound detection, future uses of the STRETCH system could include detecting chemicals and picking up satellite signals. Computerized Clothing. Jones and Martin are also working on an NSF project to develop e-textiles for special-function clothing, such as uniforms that help firefighters map their way through burning buildings, sportswear that tells athletes their speed and distance, or clothes that warn blind users about approaching objects. The most extensive uses, Martin believes, will be industrial applications in which wearable computers can display schematics for construction and maintenance workers, thus freeing their hands for tasks. With electronics woven into the fabric, they are less susceptible to being tangled, he explained. “Consequently, e-textiles can be worn in everyday situations where currently available wearable computers would hinder the user,” he said. The research team is exploring methods of dynamically tailoring the sensors and processing elements according to current needs of the user and application, rather than being fixed at design time. They are also developing software that will help researchers plot the electronics woven into fabrics after they are fashioned into apparel, “so they’ll be able to figure out what is where when the clothing comes back from the tailor,” Martin said. For more information, visit the e-textiles group webpage at http://www.ccm.ece.vt.edu/etextiles/. | About ECE | Undergraduate | Graduate | Research | Industry | People | News | Contacts | Positions | | ECE Home | College of Engineering | Virginia Tech | Privacy Statement | Contact Webmaster © 2006 Virginia Tech Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Images on this site are the property of Virginia Tech. They may not be used for commercial purposes. http://www.ece.vt.edu/news/feb03/etextile.html Last updated: Wed, Apr 9, 2003. Welcome to the Baltex Homepage. We are Constantly Shaping the Future of "Technical Textiles". We have a wide range of traditional and state of the art machinery, along with 175 years of expertise in producing Warp-Knitting and Technical Textile Fabrics, in a diverse selection of fibers. We produce Tricot, Raschel, Jersey and Spacer Fabrics. We are continually developing our fabric range, and keeping abreast of the demands in the rapidly changing world of performance specialist fibers and polymers. We keep a close focus on our customers and their requirements, and endeavor to treat each individually. We pride ourselves on high quality standards, and we strive to further improve our customer relations, and product quality. Innovation we feel is at the heart of our business, and consistently presents new opportunities and challenges for us and our customers. Please browse our web pages and see how Baltex can help you to Shape the Future of Technical Textiles.
WEARABLE ELECTRONICS. Paul Gough NXP, a spin-out of Philips Research Electronics and Clothes: Wear in and Wear out The intersection of textiles, clothes and electronics offers the possibility of radical new products. We can envisage clothes that dynamically change colour, or garments that unobtrusively monitor your physiological state, or clothes that become a second skin enhancing how you sense the world about you. But how far away are these fine visions? What can we do today and where should we head tomorrow? Conductive fibers are the principal breakthrough that is enabling textile electronics to get off the ground. These fibers; using either silver, stainless steel or carbon in various forms enable those of an electronics disposition to start to think in terms of soft, drapable electronics; rather than the usual hard forms. Of course to a degree a conductive fibre is a wire, and wires are often not considered exciting when compared to the transistors, diodes, and a myriad of IC’s that one can normally call upon. However, that is to underestimate the ingenuity of those in this nascent field, from conductive fibers we have seen components such as: • Fabric antennas • Sensors that can measure stretch • Fabric data and power buses • Fabric electrodes for measuring heart-rate and respiration sensors Beyond conductive fibers there are other technologies starting to have an impact in wearables, such as polymer electronics which enable soft keypads, strain-sensing and hold out the future promise of actuating fibers. As regards light and displays the options are still rudimentary but Electroluminescent wires, fiber optics, thermo chromic materials and LED’s are being used, or at least experimented with. With the vast amount of research focussed on flexible displays it is likely to only be a matter of time before we see the combination of these and garments. Of course below the surface is the rather nasty issue of garment wear and care. Although we often talk about caring for our garments what we really do is immerse them in a hot chemical bath and subsequently dry them at high temperatures. Clearly, one has to be cruel to be kind! However, such treatment is rather frightening to anyone who values the operation of his or her electrical equipment. Ensuring that textile electronics survives the cleaning process is really only just being investigated. Taking out sensitive electrical objects before cleaning is the main line of defense but sealing of electronics is also a possibility. A toolkit of components is slowly being assembled. Quite what will be the successful applications, long term, no one really knows. Consequently, what we see happening is a great deal of experimentation, both in applications but also in mixing disciplines, which is all quite refreshing, and what makes this an interesting and pioneering area to work in. Progress is being made in the areas of sports, fashion, medical, military and work wear domains but numbers are presently small. In all likelihood it will take a number of niche applications, were wearables provides the only viable solution to see it grow. With such well defined uncertainties it is a good time to assemble a network and generate some collaborative exploration.
E-FABRICS to Smarten Up Shoes and sheets. By Katrina C. Arabe Electro textiles may one day bring us body-monitoring shoes and bomb-detecting sheets, but for now, technology developers must tie up a few loose threads. Electronic textiles or "electro textiles" are promising to jazz up everything from shoes to shower curtains. Made from such wire- and electronic device-woven fabrics, footwear may soon tell us how fast we're running or how rapidly our heart is racing. Curtains could change hues, and shirts could play music. Indeed, at the Materials Research Society meeting in Boston last month, e-textiles were all the rage. In fact, aside from being the next fashion craze or curiosity, these fabrics also have crime-stopping potential. Laid out in walkways or buildings, large-area e-textiles can record footfalls, detect biochemical agents and nab smugglers. And for the U.S. military, these e-fabrics—which can collect environmental and biomedical data—could mean superior protection for future soldiers from enemies and the elements. But there are still wrinkles to iron out. For one, e-fabrics are too stiff to be wearable. "I'm sick of looking at e-textiles that are circuits, and not textiles," says Maggie Orth, CEO of Massachusetts-based International Fashion Machines (IFM), an MIT Media Lab startup that's working on e-textiles. The conductive fibers in these textiles must not only bend and bunch, like that of any cloth, but also withstand the turbulence of a washing machine, the jabbing of a sewing machine needle and the snapping of threads. And with all these concerns collaring in the technology, many at the MRS meeting concede that e-textiles may be more useful for industry than for apparel. Even researchers from DARPA, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, admit that currently e-textiles would be as impractical for soldiers in warfare as suits of armor. Instead, DARPA researcher Elana Ethridge suggests using e-fabrics in battlefield para foil, a parachute-like material found in kites and para gliders. A para foil made from e-textiles would be much more precise, she says, adjusting to fluctuating winds and temperatures by changing shape or texture, for steering. And because electro textiles may be able to do more than receive and transmit electrical signals, Ethridge sees their potential in explosion detection. In fact, DARPA is developing a sheet interspersed with sensors that can be rolled out like a tarpaulin to protect certain areas. Such sensor-studded sheets could detect nearby explosions, sense biochemical agents and even activate the shutdown of affected areas. In earthquake zones, says Ethridge, these large-area e-fabrics could tell us how well a building or other structure is holding up. In addition, they could be spread out just below a street or pavement to keep tabs on vehicle or pedestrian traffic because they can be made as long as required, says John Muth, an associate professor at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. However, these tarpaulin-like e-textiles and embedded sensor arrangements also pose some technical problems. For example, in a sensor-studded smart carpet, "signal attenuation (or reduction in strength) and the ability to form reliable interconnections present serious challenges," says Muth. Present telecommunications standards could take care of radio frequency interference and other concerns, says Muth. In addition, he says, engineers could develop fabrics composed of several layers—just like current microprocessors and circuit boards—"to incorporate power and data transmission on different levels." Another snag in e-fabric development is the shortage of flexible display technologies, says Orth from IFM, which is talking to Nike about making training sneakers that monitor your heart rate, hydration, blood sugar levels and even your running speed by changing color. "We have the means to collect and transmit the data, but not to display it," she says. Fortunately, Orth's shoes may be given a running start by a new development at the Xerox Research Center of Canada (see Are Silicon's Days Numbered?). Chemist Beng Ong and colleagues have recently developed printed organic electronic transistors that he says are durable enough to supplant the silicon integrated circuits in LCDs. And these transistors are likely to be featured in monitors and other devices within three to five years. In fact, such organic circuits, which can be sprayed on thin plastic sheets, may be just what we need to make flexible gadgets like roll-up televisions. "When the electronics become flexible enough that we can watch videos on the backs of people's T-shirts, then we'll really have something to talk about," says Raymond Oliver, a senior research fellow at Imperial Chemical Industries. For now, we'll have to wait a few seasons for chameleon shirts, smart underwear and toasty, thermal garments. Sources: Shoes and Sheets Get Wired Philip Ball Nature, Dec. 6, 2002 http://www.nature.com/nsu/021202/021202-11.html E-Fabrics Still Too Stiff to Wear Mark Baard.
Rick Merritt EE Times (11/01/2001 1:34 PM EST) NEW YORK — A growing group of researchers is coalescing around the idea that the future of mobile computing may have less to do with small PCs and more to do with something they call smart yarn. At the center of the activity, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has released a request for proposals that aims to bring together people and technologies in the textile and electronics industries to forge the tools, processes and fundamental technology needed to build a new class of wearable systems made of fabric. Darpa said it will devote "tens of millions of dollars" to the so-called e-textiles program over the next five years, with the first projects slated to be announced early next year. While Darpa has its eye on military applications such as parachutes that generate solar power or track satellite signals, it expects to engender a broad range of commercial products as well. Developers on both sides of the fence are hailing the effort as breathing life into a nascent market for wearable computers that to date has been focused on a relatively small opportunity: shrinking PC-like architectures for mobile workers in a handful of vertical industries. "I can't tell how fast the maturity level will go up and we'll start fielding systems, but this [e-textiles] field looks very viable," said James E. Saultz, business-development manager for Lockheed Martin's Advanced Technology Labs (Camden, N.J.). Lockheed Martin will submit a proposal for the e-textiles initiative, working with textiles researchers at Clemson, Drexel and the University of Pennsylvania as well as a number of small research companies including Trident Systems (Fairfax, Va.). "It's a very broad set of technologies we're trying to pull together here," Saultz said. Rich promise, high hurdles Technologists in and outside the Darpa program say the e-textiles area is rich with promise, but holds significant challenges. Hurdles include ramping up the performance capabilities of textiles to meet the wireless Internet dreams of consumers and redefining existing computing architectures to mesh with the capabilities of tomorrow's fabrics. "What we are not going to do is put a laptop in our jackets. We don't want to compete with CMOS," said Robert Graybill, Darpa program manager for the e-textiles initiative. Instead, the program will enable systems where "you can take your electronics and roll and crumple them up, then still expect them to work. That will open up a whole new domain of applications," he said. "What we are finding is the textile researchers and the computer architects don't even know each other," said Graybill, who hopes the project will also draw in materials scientists and software developers. "One of the goals of this program is to create this new community." Darpa aims to spur development of new kinds of yarns, fabric interconnects and CAD tools for weaving into textiles the equivalent of a printed-circuit board. Those systems will include sensors, actuators, photovoltaic devices, batteries and storage. It also aspires toward advances in reconfigurable software and low-power design, both requirements to make such systems viable. For example, the program calls for an extremely lightweight operating system that is distributed and reconfigurable in nature. "I may tear my jacket, so you need a computer architecture that can offer fault tolerance and be reconfigured," Graybill said. "The kind of computer architecture we have today may not work in this area where we have electronics distributed across a very wide area." One key to this emerging area is the relative maturity of low-cost textile production today. "As an IT guy, I was totally amazed at how sophisticated textiles are," said Graybill, who has been studying the field since he joined Darpa about two years ago. "In a printed-circuit board, you have vias and traces, and you can do that same thing with yarns." Besides large defense contractors like Lockheed Martin, a number of companies are expected to file proposals, due Dec. 6, with Darpa. Among them are materials companies such as DuPont, a consortium of electricity-generating companies and many small companies such as Softswitch Ltd. in the United Kingdom. "We hope to develop some advanced circuit boards that are complete textile integrated circuits made from fabrics," said Steven Leftly, research leader for Wronz Euralab Ltd. (West Yorkshire, U.K.), a textiles research company that is a joint-venture partner in forming Softswitch. "We are working toward entire electronics systems made of fabrics. We've even got a display made of fabrics," Leftly said. Currently, Softswitch is licensing to a number of computer, automotive and medical companies a pressure-sensitive material suitable for creating keyboards and other devices in fabric. The material uses a so-called quantum-tunneling composite that reacts to pressure, changing from an insulator to a conductor. It can be geared to respond to a wide swath of sensitivities ranging from a human breath to a truck running over it. The company has also prototyped light-emitting fabrics based on a four-layer organic light-emitting diode that can scroll dot-matrix-style characters in the manner of the Times Square news display. It expects to advance that work to a full 400 x 500-pixel fabric-based display in two years. "This is probably cheaper than a notebook computer display because the materials are cheaper and it's made on a printed system like an inkjet printing process," said Lefty. "There's starting to be what I would call a set of textile tools and industrial fabrics from companies like DuPont for distributing power and data," said Maggie Orth, founder and chief executive of International Fashion Machines, a Cambridge, Mass., startup formed in July to design smart clothes. "There are a variety of conductive fibers available today, though none are ideal, and there are starting to be products to integrate into a complete yarn system," said Orth. "But there's a lot of stuff we still have no idea how to do. The challenge in connecting things is probably one of the biggest hurdles. Another problem is, there is no silicon equivalent in textiles." Integrated material. Reinventing networking is another stumbling block. "One of the challenges is getting a good low-cost Internet for these systems. That's critical," said Darpa's Graybill. "People have yet to look at textiles as an integrated material to create devices. It's hard. I think this is the equivalent of the space program in many ways," Orth added. Today's conductive fibers are up to the task of safely sending any amount of power or signaling. As an example, Orth pointed to a $199 electronic blanket now available from Lands End that uses conductive fibers rather than wires to distribute heat. While the blanket feels as soft and flexible as any, aesthetic issues still dog most electronic-friendly yarns, Orth said. "I have seen audio sent over conductive fibers. The question is how durable is it. There's a trade-off between wearability and conductivity," she said. For its part, International Fashion Machines "lives somewhere in between the fashion designers and the technologists," Orth said. Its first project involves creating interactive logos with animations, in partnership with startup E-Ink. "We want to create stuff for the fashion industry. These people don't know what a battery is, so everything has to be integrated," said Orth. The work on e-textiles provides a fresh direction for a wearable-computer business mired in pint-size Windows PCs that can cost as much as $5,000. To date, such products have attracted business from only a limited market — mobile field workers in warehouses, airline hangers and other environments where desktop PCs prove unwieldy. At a conference on wearable computers in New York this past week, some observers estimated that market sold no more than 2,000 systems valued at $20 million last year. Roger Byford, chief executive of Vocollect Inc., took issue with that assessment, reporting that his private company alone sold several thousand StrongARM-based wearable warehousing systems last year to major accounts including Wal-Mart. He said Vocollect is growing at about 100 percent a year. Other wearable-systems makers, such as Xybernaut Corp., have been designing and testing wearables with users for several years and are just now seeing their first revenue. IBM Corp. will make 25,000 Pentium/Windows CE-based wearables for Xybernaut next year for sale to customers such as Bell Canada and Federal Express. Hitachi Ltd. has agreed to make a consumer version based on its SH-4 processor. Not another desktop "The industry has wasted $1 billion in failed products like pen computers," said Thad Starner, an associate professor at Georgia Institute of Technology, famous for wearing since 1993 his own PC104-based computer with head-mounted display. "People have perceptions of a wearable computer that led to disappointment when they saw a device. But this is not another form of a desktop computer." Starner believes that the market for wearable computers "has been underestimated. This could replace every portable consumer electronic product." He also suggested wearables could help Alzheimer's sufferers cope with their disease. "This could help people live at home longer, and that's a huge savings," Starner said. "The real problem is not the hardware, but getting people used to the concept that this is like a suit and it has to be tailored to the individual." Smart textiles - Sci- Merino. Intelligence to match merino's looks Smart textiles have the ability to sense and respond. They include fabrics and garments that can remotely activate electronic devices, generate heat, monitor vital signs, detect dangerous environments and communicate messages. The challenge is to incorporate this intelligence without affecting the attributes of the underlying textile. The next big thing. Online fashion trend bible WGSN (Worth Global Style Network) identifies smart textiles as "vitally important to the industry" and that they are "likely to prove increasingly influential as capabilities develop". AWI is working with a number of entities to ensure Australian Merino is a global leader in the development of market-ready smart textile technologies. Coated wool. Merino fibres can be coated with conductive polymers to create a touch-sensitive, interactive fabric. This technology opens up new markets where merino can be applied including security, leisure, and interior design. Softswitch™ puts you in touch One of the first smart textile applications to reach the market is the Softswitch™. With this technology, merino can interface remotely with any type of electronic device, providing on/off switching and proportional control. Softswitch™ sensors can be incorporated in upholstery, carpets, wallcoverings and other soft furnishings to control lighting, security access or airconditioning. Burton Snowboards have released jackets and backpacks that let you remotely control your iPod. Burton Jacket. Burton Snowboards backpack. The North Face has released a jacket with Softswitch controls on the chest panel that activate heating elements incorporated into the fabric. The North Face. The first wash-and-wear computer keyboard. Soft Keyboard. The Slalom Shuffle The Softswitch™ technology has already been incorporated in the products of a number of leading Sports Wear brands. Burton Snowboards have used Softswitch™ in backpacks and jackets to allow people to activate and control their Apple iPods. This means you no longer need to remove gloves in freezing conditions to get the music you want. Instead, you simply press the controls on the sleeve of your jacket, or the strap of your backpack. Other Sports Wear brands to have utilised the Softswitch™ technology include Nike, The North Face and O’Neill. The floppy keyboard and other innovations Softswitch™ has also been used to create a wash-and-wear fabric computer keyboard. Other applications include a seat occupancy sensor to indicate whether the passenger airbag needs to be deployed in the event of a crash. Heated Wool Textiles. Wireless heated wool textiles can be woven, non-woven or knitted wool fabrics with internal electrical heating properties. AWI and Canesis are already well advanced on a heated wool sock, and the technology will soon be applied to bedding, general apparel and upholstery. AWI and Canesis have utilised smart textiles to create the heated wool sock. Heated Wool Sock. Intelligent infant bedding could detect movement and temperature and help reduce SIDS deaths. Intelligent Infant Bedding. Intelligent active wear could monitor heart rate and performance levels. The North Face. Long haul passengers could wear intelligent health garments to prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis. Soft Keyboard. The keyboard you can fold and pocket it. Infant Bedding. By integrating sensors within merino fabric, bedding can be created which detects movement and monitors temperature. This advanced fibre technology has obvious application in the area of hospital bedding, and in infant bedding could potentially reduce deaths due to SIDS. Intelligent sports wear. Wool sensor yarns in intelligent sports wear could monitor heart rate, body temperature, next to skin humidity and performance levels. These could be used by elite athletes or create a quasi personal trainer for the enthusiastic amateur. Health garments. Garments can be created which monitor critical vital signs for specific medical conditions, and alert the wearer when they are at danger. Smart textiles could be used to aid those at risk from heart attack, diabetes and Deep Vein Thrombosis. Medical applications Wool sensor yarns can be woven into disposable bandages to alert medical staff to movement or strain so as to limit further damage and aid in rehabilitation. Protective clothing. Clothing can be created that detects harmful chemicals and poisonous gases, or emits light for high visibility. This could mean smart textiles becoming standard issue for miners, firemen, ambulance drivers, and road workers. Intelligent Protective wear could warn miners about poisonous gas build up. Miners Underground. Electro-mechanical fabric sensors Sensors can be incorporated in fabrics to measure electrical resistance. Any subsequent alteration in the resistance then indicates there has been deformation of the fabric. Self - modifying. Fabrics and garments can be created which alter their own shape, and then memorize that configuration for future recall. Summary. Smart textiles, fabrics and garments with the ability to sense and respond, represent a massive opportunity for the textile industry. Infusing fiber with electronic fashion, they open up an exciting new world of possible applications and commercial potential. After the encouraging success of the Softswitch™ development, AWI will continue to seek out and invest in partners with the imagination and the technical know-how to turn science fiction into tactile textile reality. Return to UV protection article * Burlington Worldwide - July 07 * ONLY EWE - May 07 * Klimeo - Oct 06 * UV Protection - Jul 06 * Smart Textiles - Sept 05 Safety benefit bulletproof factsheet hotsite burton anti static fact sheet hotsite tftcsiro environmentally fact sheet
China : Jordan invites investment from local textile industry August 1, 2007 On June 8 this year, Zhu Min Ru, Chairman of China Nonwovens & Industrial Textiles Association (CNITA) met the President of National Industrial Park, overseas business development general manager and other visiting delegates from Jordan in Beijing. They exchanged views over the encouraging status of Chinese industrial textiles and nonwoven businesses in order to build factories in QIZ industrial parks established by Jordan and Egypt. Firstly, members of the Jordan delegation introduced the park's status and various preferential policies of enterprises that will enter the park along with Jordan's profiles. The Chinese side made comprehensive and detailed inquiries about specific contents of attracting business policy from Jordan side. Zhu Min Ru then discussed the development of Chinese industrial textiles and nonwovens industry. Jordan's capital Amman is the regional, commercial, financial and communications center for West Asia and has stable political situation, good social order, sound infrastructure, developed financial system and an active capital market. The country also enjoys preferential treaties like qualified industrial zones agreement (QIZ) and free trade agreement with the US under which the country's exports to US are duty-free and quota-free. It has the same trade benefits in Europe and 16 Arab countries. Jordan welcomed Chinese enterprises that are going to invest in the country. Delegates assured that the country would cooperate with China Industrial Textile Association and hope to attract companies for investment. China Nonwovens & Industrial Textiles Association
India : CVCIGP II client invests in JBF Global August 1, 2007 CVCIGP II Client Rosehill Limited,Mauritius and their affiliates which are within the structure of Citigroup Venture Capital International Growth Funds, managed by Citigroup, is investing a sum of USD 118 million into JBF Global Pte Ltd, Singapore, subsidiary of JBF Industries Limited by way of fully convertible securities. These funds are meant to be used for international operations of the Company. JBF Industries Limited, a Rs 1,611 crores , leading manufacturer of Polyester Chips and Polyester Yarn. Headquartered in Mumbai, JBF is India’s largest polyester chips producer and third largest POY producer post its recent expansions. The company has a total of 4 units – 3 at Silvassa and 1 at Sarigam. JBF was initially set up as a POY manufacturer in 1996, and gradually integrated backwards into polyester chips in 2001. JBF Industries is the largest polyester chips manufacturer and 3rd largest POY manufacturer in India. The Company has began production at its RAK plant, a USD 90 million plant in Emirates, a joint venture with RAKIA (Ras Al Khaimah Investment Authority) for setting up a Polyester PET resin packaging in the Emirate of Ras Al Khaimah The plant, a world class manufacturing facility with a capacity of 900t/day polymerization with a production of 600t/day of SSP chips, and 300t/day Polyester Film will address the three large markets of USA, EU, Middle East & Africa . This is the first plant of this size set up by an Indian company in the Emirates. The new facility started its first phase production in July 2007. The Company has polymerisation capacity of 900 TPD. In the 2nd Phase " JBF RAK FZ LLC" expects to start production of Polyester Film (BOPET) by quarter ending 31st December 2007. JBF Industries Ltd has set up a subsidiary JBF Global Pte Ltd in Singapore. JBF RAK FZ LLC will be part of JBF Global Pvt Ltd. Says Mr B C Arya, Chairman, JBF Industries Ltd “We are well placed as a manufacturer of Polyester and Polyester Chips to address the global markets. Our expertise in project planning and management has been well proved with our success in our expansions in our Sarigram Plant and in the RAK plant."
Sri Lanka: Govt to set up Nano -tech Park worth $55 million. July 24, 2007 Government of Sri Lanka in partnership with the private sectors plans to build a Nano-Tech park on a 50-acre land in Homagama, at the southern part of its commercial capital Colombo. This project will engage an investment of US $55million. The project is likely to take five years to complete, according to Minister of science and Technology Thissa Witharana. A temporary laboratory is already being set up, and Witharana says the country could be developed to larger extent if available raw material can be used more efficiently. Ravi Silva, a nanotechnology expert said that Sri Lanka Institute of Nanotechnology will jointly work with local Universities and the National Science foundation (NSF), to create a task force to operate the technology park. Silva also says the Nanotech business across the world is estimated to engage over a trillion US dollars and would provide the much needed revenue to the Sri Lankan economy. Of the Sri Lankan GDP, 0.14 percent or US$ 40 million is spent on research and development, compared to the USA where over four Billion Dollars is spent.
USA : Eleksen offers latest in touch-sensitive fabric July 19, 2007 Eleksen Group plc, the world’s leading provider of touch-sensitive smart fabrics for consumer electronics in apparel and accessories announced that its new Evaluation Kit is available to designers, academics, and journalists looking to gain first-hand experience with ElekTex technology. The Evaluation Kit represents an ideal first step for those looking to develop commercial applications using ElekTex. ElekTex is a unique electro-conductive fabric touch pad optimized for the creation of flexible, durable, and rugged fabric interfaces. It provides endless opportunities for those looking to develop novel wearable technology, innovative consumer electronics accessories, and other products. The Evaluation Kit consists of a standard ElekTex sensor and its associated control electronics module which connects to a Windows PC via a USB port. Also included in the kit are three fabric overlays which together with the appropriate software drivers provide application examples of the ElekTex sensor used as a Keyboard, Drawing Pad and Multimedia Controls. The aim is to familiarize the user with the programming versatility of the ElekTex sensor which can be reconfigured on-the-fly to support a variety of applications. “ElekTex is arguably the most advanced smart fabric technology in the market today and it can be used to support an endless range of wearable consumer electronics applications,” said Vassilis Seferidis, VP Product Management atEleksen. “We’re certain that our new Evaluation Kit will ease access to our technology and assist design and technical professionals in realizing their smart fabric design possibilities.” Eleksen Group plc
USA : Craghoppers chooses Eleksen smart fabric iPod controls July 23, 2007 Eleksen Group plc the world’s leading provider of touch-sensitive smart fabrics for consumer electronics in apparel and accessories announces that multichannel brand Craghoppers has chosen to initiate a relationship to produce stylish wearable electronic apparel. Craghoppers’ iPod-ready Future walking jacket will be the first product to result from this new alliance. Craghoppers is known for its attractive and rugged outdoor, travel, and adventure wear. Continuing its mission of utilizing the most advanced fabric technology, Craghoppers has teamed with Eleksen to incorporate unique smart fabric into its latest outdoor gear. Eleksen’s ElekTex is a unique electro-conductive fabric touch pad optimized for the creation of flexible, durable fabric touch screen interfaces. Craghoppers will integrate ElekTex smart fabric touchpads into its new line of jackets, enabling wearers to control the volume, track changes, and power controls of their iPod through fabric buttons built directly into the sleeves while keeping the iPod itself safety tucked away in their pocket. “The iPod-enabled Future jacket is just one example of the innovation that ElekTex will help bring to our product lines,” said Jim McNamara, Managing Director of Craghoppers. “ElekTex enables highly practical goods—adding another level of excitement and functionality to our product offerings.” “Craghoppers has built a reputation for advanced technological fabrics for extreme conditions,” said Robin Shephard, CEO of Eleksen. “By leveraging ElekTex smart fabric, Craghoppers brings comfort and style to the world of wearable electronics.”
USA : Eleksen offers latest in touch-sensitive fabric July 19, 2007 Eleksen Group plc, the world’s leading provider of touch-sensitive smart fabrics for consumer electronics in apparel and accessories announced that its new Evaluation Kit is available to designers, academics, and journalists looking to gain first-hand experience with ElekTex technology. The Evaluation Kit represents an ideal first step for those looking to develop commercial applications using ElekTex. ElekTex is a unique electro-conductive fabric touch pad optimized for the creation of flexible, durable, and rugged fabric interfaces. It provides endless opportunities for those looking to develop novel wearable technology, innovative consumer electronics accessories, and other products. The Evaluation Kit consists of a standard ElekTex sensor and its associated control electronics module which connects to a Windows PC via a USB port. Also included in the kit are three fabric overlays which together with the appropriate software drivers provide application examples of the ElekTex sensor used as a Keyboard, Drawing Pad and Multimedia Controls. The aim is to familiarize the user with the programming versatility of the ElekTex sensor which can be reconfigured on-the-fly to support a variety of applications. “ElekTex is arguably the most advanced smart fabric technology in the market today and it can be used to support an endless range of wearable consumer electronics applications,” said Vassilis Seferidis, VP Product Management atEleksen. “We’re certain that our new Evaluation Kit will ease access to our technology and assist design and technical professionals in realizing their smart fabric design possibilities.”
Germany: New highly durable ElekTex sensors ideal for suits & evening gowns June 12, 2007 Eleksen Group plc the world’s leading provider of touch-sensitive smart fabrics for consumer electronics in apparel and accessories announces the release of new dry cleanable, programmable sensor technology the next generation of its flagship ElekTex sensors for embedding in apparel to create wearable electronics. This latest innovation is particularly suitable for apparel manufacturers to embed into everyday clothing which experiences higher cleaning frequency than ski jackets and winter coats. The new sensor is suitable for integration into hoodies, board shorts, shirts and jeans and also works for high fashion apparel such as evening gowns and suits, enabling control of most popular electronic devices. ElekTex smart fabric transforms labels and jacket sleeves into controls for mobile entertainment and communications devices. The sensors are popular among top clothing designers, based on the lightweight design and amazing durability. In this latest technology breakthrough, Eleksen has created this new version of ElekTex textile touchpads that can be dry cleaned, opening the door for manufacturers of more high-end apparel to incorporate this novel technology into their designs. The new sensor technology features universal controls that can be programmed to be compatible with a wide spectrum of electronics, from iPods to smart phones to Zune devices. With the new universal controls, ultimately consumers will be able topurchase one ElekTex-enabled jacket, for example, and switch in and out various entertainment devices along with compatible electronics. “Apparel manufacturers appreciate the cost-effectiveness and flexibility of ElekTex,” said Robin Shephard, CEO of Eleksen. “This next evolution of our sensor technology is easy to adapt to different types of electronics and even to modify the number of buttons on the controls. Now with the ability to dry clean this highly durable material, we expect to see a wealth of new high-end clothing lines utilizing ElekTex sensors.”
Germany: iThermX technology from Interactive hand Wear for ski glove,keeping your hands at body temperature in freezing cold.(picture - else where) January 30, 2007 Interactive Wear AG (based in Starnberg near Munich), a specialist for wearable electronics, is introducing a new technology platform called “iThermX” that makes it possible to implement intelligent, flexible, light-weight heating systems to be incorporated into any type of textile product. The main components of the basic system include: • An electronics unit with a 16-bit microcontroller that manages the intelligent power and temperature control and executes custom and application-specific programmable heating algorithms. • Special, highly flexible thermal conductors that can be attached to nearly any type of fabric/textile. • Particularly flat and lightweight lithium ion batteries that feature a high degree of efficiency and – depending on the application and the requirements for heat/power – can be attached individually or distributed on/in the garment in a way that is nearly invisible and is very comfortable for the wearer. These rechargeable power sources supply heat energy for several hours at a time. • Signaling and power lines that are integrated into the textile to link the temperature sensors, on/off switch, indicator LEDs and batteries with the central electronics and the heating elements. The iThermX technology platform makes it possible to create overall systems that are smaller, lighter, more mobile and more flexible than the conventional solutions that have been available on the market up until now. First Product: “Solaris” Brand Ski Gloves with ThermoTec from Reusch At ispo winter 07 (4 – 7 February 2007, at the New Munich Trade Fair Center), Reusch, one of the world’s leading glove manufacturers, will be presenting the ThermoTec heating system for the first time – a technology that was developed in close cooperation with Interactive Wear. Well-preserved textiles unearthed in 2,500-yr-old tomb US & EU remain top importers for skirts Members Only Tefron to release Q2 2007 results on Aug 9 Country to ink CEPA with INDIA. ITC may make foray into retail sector World cotton consumption to shoot up by 2% HUGO BOSS H1 net income up 18% Cotton prices maintain a rising trend Nonwoven fabric production brings rosy result.
Germany: Coating ranges at Techtextil from Monforts May 2, 2007 A. Monforts Textilmaschinen GmbH will display a number of coating ranges with its Montex stenter offering coating and finishing/heat setting options at Techtextil, June 12-14, Hall 3.0, Booth F30. Monforts Application Technologists, responsible for treating technical textiles and nonwoven fabrics, will also be available to discuss special coating and finishing issues with customers and visitors. Techtextil is the leading international trade fair for technical textiles and nonwovens. The complete global market of technical textiles will be show-cased at the most important forum for the industry. Discover new materials and innovative concepts. Being a leading manufacturer on the global market A. Monforts Textilmaschinen produces machines and ranges for diving and finishing of woven and knitted fabrics.
Germany : Human Solutions to present motor cycle protective Suits. January 22, 2007 Human Solutions GmbH of Kaiserslautern will take part in the largest Finnish Motorcycle Fair at the beginning of February 2007 in Helsinki - at the booth of Rukka, the sports clothing manufacturer, trade visitors and motorcycle fans can find out all about motorcycle protective suits that have optimal size & fit. Dr. Jochen Balzulat, Head of the Body Scanning Division at Human Solutions, explaining the company's presence at this event said, "Our joint appearance with Rucca at this Exhibition can open up new Northern European target groups for us. Rukka manufactures high-grade specialized clothing for discerning motorcyclists - at their booth, we will demonstrate to visitors how an absolutely perfect fit in protective clothing can be achieved by means of our 3D Body Scanner." "Rukka also supplies the Finnish police force - so we will also be taking our XFIT clothing software to Finland. XFIT is a proven solution for the cost-effective determination of uniformed personnel requirements – drastically reducing outfitting and warehousing costs. The Helsinki Exhibition will give us the opportunity to address end customers for tailored motorcycle garments - and to introduce out product portfolio to the police, the armed forces and other Scandinavian organizations." Rukka and Human Solutions will be presenting jackets and pants in the Armadillo range for men and in the Armarina range for female motorcyclists. Rukka's partner CENTRIA already uses a Human Solutions body scanner and acted as mutual contact for the Rukka/Human Solutions joint exhibition appearance in February - a well-known Finnish research institute, CENTRIA’s research spectrum also encompasses the apparel industry.
UK: Bennett Safetywear launches BEAT SAFE slash-resistant uniform gloves June 14, 2007 Bennett Safetywear Ltd (BSL), the specialist safety glove manufacturer which celebrates its 70th anniversary this year, has launched the latest addition to its BEATSAFE range of Slash - Resistant uniform gloves. The SENTINEL glove has a high quality water-resistant cape leather outer and a lightweight DYNEEMA composite lining incorporating the very latest in fibre and yarn technology and offering a high level of cut-resistance. The lining is significantly softer and more comfortable than traditional lining materials and offers the “cool to the touch” sensation associated with DYNEEMA, as well as easier donning and doffing. The SENTINEL glove is being marketed at competitive prices whilst maintaining the high quality associated with Bennett Safety wear products. Bennett Safety wear pioneered the concept of the slash-resistant uniform glove in the UK in 1994 when it developed its first BEATSAFE glove for West Yorkshire Police. Established in 1937, BSL has evolved from its humble beginnings as a small scale leather merchant and is recognized today as a European market leader in the manufacture of safety gloves and specialized protective clothing for industrial, police, military and fire-fighting applications. BSL also manufactures market defining protective clothing, featuring both heat-resistant and cut-resistant ranges (comprising of trousers, jumpers, aprons, wrist guards, sleeves and jackets). There is even a large range of items offering varying degrees of ballistic and anti-stab protection. Bennett Safetywear Ltd.
VIETNAM: Hotexco builds garment factory worth $3.4 million August 2, 2007 Hoa Tho Textile and Garment Joint Stock Company (Hotexco) has recently started construction of its subsidy garment factory in Quang Tri, located in the Central province of Vietnam with an investment of VND 54 billion (US $3.4 million). The new facility, covering an area of 27,880 square metres in South Dong Ha Industrial zone, would install 20 garment manufacturing lines. According to Tran Van Pho, General Director of Hotexco, all products from this factory would be exported. However, in the initial period, only four lines would be working. Hotexco, based in Da Nang city, is one of the leading garment companies under Vietnam National Textile and Apparel Group (VINATEX) and is presently operating five subsidy textile and garment companies and one fashion trading center that employs around 6,000 people. The company exports most of its products in the US market with 50 percent and in EU with 25 percent of its total exports turnover. Hotexco is in partners with big industrial players like Nike, Puma, Haggar and Perry Ellis. In 2006, Hotexco obtained exports turnover of $45 million and forecast to reach US$50 million in 2007. Fibre2fashion News Desk - Vietnam.
USA : Ashland to invest $.80 million in China. August 2, 2007 Ashland Inc announced nearly $80 million in expansion projects for the company's operations in China. The projects consist of a new resin production plant and a technology and business services center. "The growth we are experiencing in China's dynamic business environment is exciting, and our continued strategic investment in this region further positions Ashland as an industry leader," said Dale MacDonald, president of Ashland China. "These investments will further support our ability to service customers and to develop products and technologies to meet the needs of the local market." A new unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) plant, to be built in northern China, represents an estimated initial $35 million investment. Current plans call for the plant to be operational in 2009. "This project marks the second resin production facility for Ashland in China, and it will be our fifth manufacturing site in the country," said MacDonald. Ashland's existing UPR production plant in Changzhou, constructed in 2005, is currently being expanded to triple its production capacity. Ashland's other capital expansion project announced today is a $43 million technology and commercial center, which will be located in Shanghai. "It is vital to our continued success in China that we provide in-country product and application development support," said Luca Fontana, chief technology officer for Ashland. "With this new center, Ashland will be able to pro actively provide our customers in this region with the scientific and technological expertise they need to effectively compete in today's global marketplace." The facility, expected to be completed in 2008, will also house management and business services that support Ashland's operations throughout China. With more than 400 employees in China, Ashland currently has offices in Shanghai and Beijing, and manufacturing facilities in Beijing, Changzhou, Kunshan and Nanjing. Ashland Inc.
NOT IN INDIA - WHY - ?.
Smart Technology. We are inspired to mimic nature in order to create clothing materials with higher levels of functions and smartness Cloning silk fibres was a first step. Can the skin -a smart material- be mimicked?. The skin has sensors that can detect pressure, pain, ambient conditions,etc. and can intelligently function with environmental stimuli. Smart textiles are materials and structures that sense and react to environmental conditions or stimuli, such as those from mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, magnetic or other sources. Smart textiles are no longer a science-fiction fantasy. For example, there are in the market self-cleaning carpets, memory-shaped and environment-responsive textiles, and anti-insomniac micro-fiberes. According to the manner of reaction, smart textiles can be divided into: §Passive smart materials, which can only sense the environmental condition or stimuli, §Active smart materials, which sense and react to the condition or stimuli, §Very smart materials, which can sense, react and adapt themselves accordingly,and §Intelligent materials, which are those capable of responding or activated to perform a function in a manual or pre-programmed. How does a smart material work?. The sensors provide a nerve system to detect signals The processor analyzes and evaluates the signals The actuators act upon the detected and evaluated signal either directly or from a central control unit. Areas of Research & Development. For sensors - actuators: §photo-sensitive materials. §fibre optics. §conductive polymers. §thermal sensitive materials. §shape memory materials. §intelligent coating materials. §chemical responsive materials. §micro-capsules §micro- and nano-materials. For signal transmission,processing and control: §neural networks and control systems. §cognition theory and systems. For integrated processes and products: §wearable electronics and photonics. §adaptive and responsive structures. §bio-mimics. §tissue engineering. §chemical/drug releasin. PCERF.Modified on 11/05/2003. This web page is located @. http://www.ualberta.ca/~jag3/smart_textiles/Page_5.html This web page is located @. http://www.ualberta.ca/~jag3/smart_textiles/. Contact the Webmaster. Footer
What Lies Ahead ? The range and variety of high performance textiles that have been developed to meet present and future requirements are now considerable Textile materials are now combined, modified and tailored in ways far beyond the performance limit of fibres drawn from the silkworm cocoon, grown in the fields, or spun from the fleece of animals And the future promises even more! What new capacities should we expect as a result of future developments? They should include tera and nano scale magnitudes, complexity, cognition and holism The new capability of tera scale will take us three orders of magnitude beyond the present general-purpose and generally accessible computing capabilities. The technology of nano scale will take us three orders of magnitude below the size of most of today’s human-made devices §It will allow us to arrange molecules inexpensively in most of the ways permitted by physical laws §It will let us make supercomputers that fit on the head of a fiber, and fleets of medical nano-robots smaller than a human cell to eliminate cancers, infections, clogged arteries Fibers will relentlessly replace traditional materials in many more applications. From super-absorbent diapers, to artificial organs, to construction materials for moon-based space stations Heat generating/storing fibers/fabrics are being used in skiwear, shoes, helmets, etc Fabrics and composites integrated with optical fibers sensors will be used to monitor bridges and buildings Garments integrated with sensors and motherboards will detect and transmit injury and health information of the wearer Clothing with its own senses and brain will be integrated with Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and mobile phone technology to provide the position of the wearer and directions Biological tissues and organs, like ears and noses, will be grown from textile scaffolds made from bio-degradable fibers Integrated with nano-materials, textiles will be imparted with very high energy absorption capacity and other functions such as stain proofing, abrasion resistance, light emission, etc. © 2003 PCERF Modified on 11/05/2003 01:14:22 Modified on 10/04/2003 This web page is located @ http:// www.ualberta.ca.
Research at I I T-Delhi,on wound dressing material. Technology Profile... Wound Dressing Material And Method For Its Preparation Developed by Jassal Manjeet (Mrs.) Dr. manjeet@netearth.iitd.ernet.in Ray Alok Dr. alokray@cbme.iitd.ernet.in Department/Centre Textile Technology Center for Biomedical Engineering Background: Alginate wound dressings are becoming increasingly popular in wound management specially in treating heavily exuding wounds. But the poor structural integrity, poor strength of alginate fiber, uncontrolled high absorbing property of alginate dressings are acting as bottle neck in Alginate wound dressing to become the most predominant type of wound dressing material. From this point of view, a stable, stronger, covalently bonded alginate has been developed by using bi-functional crosslinkers through esterification reaction. Description: The method of preparation of covalently cross linked Alginate gels and the composite with non woven backing sheets is described below : (i) Preparation of gel : Water soluble salts of alginic acid such as sodium potassium, ammonium, alginate etc. with a specific concentration are used and to this solution, a solution of non-gelling salts such as sodium chloride, Potassium chloride, Magnesium chloride etc having the desired molecular weight are added to make a uniform gel solution. Acid catalysts can be added to catalyse the esterification reaction, maintaining a specific pH value. This is followed by the addition of bifunctional cross-linking agents and mixing thoroughly by magnetic stirrers to prepare a more uniform gel solution. To this solution crosslinking salt of the desired concentration is added for cross-linking esterification reaction; (ii) Preparation of composite: The nonwoven backing sheet preferably cellulose-based having better absorption capacity, air permeability is selected. Blended nonwovens prepared by mixing man made fibers with cellulosic maters can also be used. The nonwoven material is soaked with cross-linking salt having a specific concentration.. Covalently cross linked alginate gels are then coated/impregnated above the nonwoven sheet on one side and then again dipped in the solution of cross-linking salt to prepare the composite. Special Features: The covalently cross-linked alginate gel network structure and uniform gel structure help to obtain much stable gel as compared with only ionically cross-linked alginate; As the length of the crosslinking chain increases, the rigidity of the gel network reduces and the gel can withstand more force; The networking helps in holding the absorbed blood and physiological fluids coming from the exuding wound; The water soluble, insoluble and protein drugs can be loaded into the network structure to have controlled release wound dressing material; Due to the presence of covalently bonded crosslinkers (as for example polyethylene glycol) the dressing will be easily peeled off from wound surface without applying much force. Prospective Users: All medical establishments like hospitals, dispensaries, nursing homes etc. Keywords: Alginate, Wound, Gel, Nonwoven, Dressing Type of Technology: Product Status of IPR Protection: Indian Patent Application No. 736/DEL/2002 dt. 11.7.2002 with title "Development of a new Alginate Based Wound Dressing Material." Status of Development: Composite dressing material on batch scale has been prepared and tested satisfactorily in the laboratory Major Equipment & Facilities required: For production : Constant Temperature reaction baths; Stirring assemblies; Coating device (batch or continuous basis); Drying equipment; Glass wares, etc; For quality control and testing: Test equipment for Moisture absorption, Gel strength and bio adhesion. Requirement of Raw Materials/Components: Alginate p-toluenesulphonic acid Sodium Chloride Services offered by Technology Transfer: Know how manual including quality control procedures Process demonstration Consultancy For further informatiom, Please contact directly the faculty member/inventor under intimation to Managing Director, FITT, mdfitt@gmail.com.
Technology Profile... Improved Antimicrobial Nylon Sutures and Products Thereof Developed by Gupta Bhuvanesh Professor bgupta@textile.iitd.ernet.in Harpal Singh Professor harpal@cbme.iitd.ernet.in Department/Centre Textile Technology Center for Biomedical Engineering Background: Surgical sutures, particularly of non-absorbable type shall possess good biocompatible and antimicrobial properties. These are made of either natural or synthetic material. From the end usage requirement, the base material should have better strength and elasticity, ease for handling as well as more affinity to the coating material. Further, the delivery of antimicrobial agent shall be slow initially and sustained for longer duration for improving the healing process by eliminating the danger of infection and inflammation. Since the presently available sutures does not have all these quality requirements together, an inherently atimicrobial and biocompatible drug delivery nylon suture has been developed. These sutures have wider application also. Description: Saturated solution of poly-N-vinyl-pyrrolidinone-iodine complex is prepared in a low boiling solvent. Nylon chips are reacted with this solution for obtaining homogeneous coating of the solution on the chips. The chips are subsequently dried and subjected to spinning to draw a filament, preferably a mano-filament. Drawing multi-filaments is avoided since they are prone to transmission of bacteria through the hidden areas in such filaments. To enhance the strength of the filament, it is drawn at the prescribed temperature with a particular force. The suture prepared as per the above procedure, have polar bonding between nylon and poly-N-vinyl-pyrrolidinone-iodine complex, which results in the slow and controlled release of iodine from the sutures. Also they have demonstrated inherent microbial properties in addition to being biocompatible. Special Features: Inherently antimicrobial and biocompatible suture which enables to stop the growth of microbes right at the first step; Release of Iodine is initially slow and increase sharply and then levels-off for a longer duration, making the suture suitable for wider application; Does not cause side effects; Improved strength and elasticity as well as knot security; Easy handling and cost effective Prospective Users: All hospitals and Nursing homes involved in minor and major surgical operation Keywords: Sutures, Antimicrobial, Nylon, Biocompatible Type of Technology: Product Status of IPR Protection: Indian Patent Application No. 3032/DEL/98 dated 13.10.1999 having title ' A Method for preparation of Improved Antimicrobial Nylon Sutures and Products thereof' Status of Development: The technology has been developed with the facilities available in IIT, Delhi on batch and continuous operations. Major Equipment & Facilities required: Extruder, Drawing unit, Reaction vessels, drier, etc. at a total estimated cost of 15 lakhs. appr Requirement of Raw Materials/Components: Polypropylene Poly-N-vinyl-pyrrolidinone-iodine Acetone Services offered by Technology Transfer: Know how manual including quality control procedures Process demonstration Consultancy services For further informatiom, Please contact directly the faculty member/inventor under intimation to Managing Director, FITT, mdfitt@gmail.com. (my personal opinion - can we say it is technical textiles research)
A CHAIR IN YOUR DRESS. Nothing brightens my day better than an inflatable dress! Self-Sustainable Chair, by Joo Youn Paek (designer of the Polite Umbrella and the Pillowig), works a bit like the Uniblow Outfits. The dress is made up of 7 trash bags, 2 foot-pumps and a pair of slippers. The shoes pump air into an inflatable bubble attached to its rear part on each step, slowly turning the garment into a chair. The chair is slowly deflated under the weight of the wearer, motivating him or her to consistently switch between walking and sitting as a loop behavior on the street. The balance between exercise and rest would be maintained by wearing this suit. The purpose of this project is to transform the humdrum experiences produced by routine walking commutes into an amusing interacti6e performance. More inflatable garments: wearable canoe; The Life Dress; the Inflatable Breasts Dress; Fat Suits; Wearable Crisis Management; Modes for Urban Moods and Inflatable wedding dress; SurvivaBall and the Aeolian Ride. The Self-Sustainable Chair is part of Unravel, a fashion show curated by Amanda Parkes (check out her boots that pump out air as you walk). Place & Time: Monday Aug 6, 2007 8:30PM / The Chapters Party ‘On Broadway’ 615 Broadway / San Diego.
Music by e - textiles. Danielle Wilde describes her latest project, the hipDisk, as being possibly the most undignified musical instrument ever. hipDisk exploits changing relationships between torso and hip to actuate sound. Video 1 and 2. Simple horizontal disk-shaped extensions of the body exaggerate the interdependent relationship of the hip and torso. Soft switches, strategically placed around the perimeter of each disk, allow the wearer to play a chromatic scale, and thus simple melodies, restricted only by flexibility and speed of swing. In creating hipDisk, the interest was to move beyond limb- and digit-triggered switches and explore full-body movement for actuation. Ultimately, three iterations of hipDisk will be developed so that a small orchestra of hipDisked women can play chord structures together, or harmonize and so accompany voice or another solo performer/player. A version of the instrument may also be developed for men. Yes, please, please Danielle, do make a version for lads! Danielle lists in her paper (PDF) the various projects that hipDisk builds upon and relates to. Here are just a few of them: - the interface is related to Kei Kagami's Head Holder (2006), a dress that explores dynamic structures by means of rods and strings that cause exaggerated movement of the garment by the motion of the model or wearer, - the output of hipDisk is related to Danielle’s previous work Ange, which allows the player to trigger sound samples and control volume, so mix up to 24 samples in real-time, simply by manipulating their volume, - the input/output relationship is also simple and direct, the tones triggered through core-body gesture, allowing us to make a correlation to physical interfaces like Dance Dance Revolution. Also by Danielle Wilde: the periscope, the musical ribcage and the Dress.
SPACE WAR. E-Textiles For Battlefield Sound Detection To Begin Field Tests Artist's rendering of sound-detection array woven into new e-textile as part of the STRETCH project Washington - Sep 30, 2002 For decades, electronics have been getting smaller and smaller. Now, engineers are turning to one of mankind's oldest arts -- weaving -- for a cost-effective way of making certain devices bigger and bigger. The STRETCH program is a cooperative venture between the University of Southern California and Virginia Tech that is now testing a prototype "e-textile" -- a special cloth interwoven with microelectronic components. The cloth functions as a supersensitive detection array to pinpoint sources of faint sounds, specifically, the sounds of distant vehicles moving on future battlefields. According to its creators, STRETCH is the first time an e-textile has been produced that can perform all aspects of such a complicated process. "Modern methods of making fabrics allow extraordinary control over materials and properties," says Robert Parker, director of the Arlington, Virginia campus of the USC School of Engineering's Information Sciences Institute, and co-principal investigator on STRETCH. "And cloth has properties that can be very useful for certain electronic applications. We can easily and cheaply make very large pieces of cloth, light and very strong, that can be stretched over frames into any desired shape." The material Parker and his co-investigator, Mark Jones of the Configurable Computing Laboratory at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, VA, have created could be deployed in various ways: as a parachute, a tent, a camouflage net, a sail, or simply as a bolt of cloth rolled compactly away until needed. However deployed, the idea is the same, they say. Modern methods of detection use arrays of individual detectors, arranged in a pattern, and combine the reports from all into a detailed image using sophisticated computational algorithms. Parker and his ISI colleagues have long been working on arrays made up of small, standalone detectors that are individually placed in the environment, and communicate with each other by radio. But embedding similar units into fabric has advantages, according to Parker. "The signals they exchange can be carried on wires in the fabric. This greatly lowers the power requirements to operate the system." Additionally, signal exchanges by radio can potentially be picked up by an adversary, giving away not only the fact that surveillance is underway, but also the position of the surveillors -- a potentially fatal drawback in modern battlefield conditions. "Forming it into a fabric makes it electronically silent." says Jones. Additionally, while embedding the detectors in fabric sacrifices the flexibility of individual standalone units, it ensures the units will be automatically be in the right positions relative to each other to do their jobs optimally. The STRETCH fabric will begin testing in field environments in November. Many problems have to be resolved. As Parker notes, "while fabric manufacturing technology is advanced, we expect that the large number of components and the inherent imprecision in the process will make it difficult to weave very large, fault-free arrays." Making these tough enough to stand up to weather and rough handling in field conditions is another challenge. However, in preliminary tests, the material has proven robust. It can be rolled (though not folded) and unrolled, without damage. And even when numbers of the individual units fail, the detector is still able to function effectively. Will soldiers' wardrobes someday include sound detector sweaters, satellite signal antenna hats, or chemical sniffer vests? Not right away -- but perhaps soon. Related Links ISI VT Configurable Computing Laboratory.
Researchers Weave Electronic Textiles. BY Lydia Fong Contribution Writer Wednesday, March 3, 2004 Click to Enlarge courtesy/josei lee UC Berkeley researchers have developed an innovative method of directly forming transistors on fabric. The technique brings widespread e-textiles closer to reality. Mail, music and toothbrushes have seen the transformation, and now fashion meets function in the latest thing to go electronic-clothing. Josei Lee, a second year graduate student in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, in collaboration with EECS professor Vivek Subramanian, is developing a new approach to making electronic textiles that builds intelligence into fabric. "The idea is that you can someday have all your little gadgets integrated into your clothing," Lee said. While existing e-textiles have electronics wired separately into the fabric, Lee is the first to form transistors directly on fabric. This creates a dynamic switching that allows the fabric to handle data routing and information processing on its own, and the ability to route a signal around a tear in the fabric. "There's no elegant way available right now to have different parts of the e-textile application to talk to each other once you have your things embedded," said Lee. "And that's what we're working on-the architecture for e-textiles." Lee said. The process is compatible with existing textile manufacturing technology, making it potentially more cost-effective and efficient for large-scale e-textile production. "This should be the true enabling technology for e-textiles," Lee said. "So far that's the one road block that has prevented e-textiles from being really viable-it's just too expensive." Current e-textiles can be used to monitor its wearer's vital signs, like heart rate and blood oxygen level, or to measure chemical environments. The new method could allow for the integration of cell phones and other portable devices into clothing, though Lee said that there is no telling when such products will be available. "What I've done is the very, very first step. It's a demonstration of concept," Lee said. �
Wearable Computing: A Good Fit? PALO ALTO, Calif., Aug. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- With massive advances in computing technology, the next big thing on the horizon that promises to completely transform the lives of mobile employees across the world is wearable computing. This emerging technology combines revolutionary concepts such as context awareness and electronics textiles (e-textiles) with innovative display systems to deliver greatly enhanced employee productivity. "Providing the workforce with the ability to work in a hands-free mode while operating a computer forms the basis for the future of wearable computing," notes Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst Subrahmania Janakiraman. "Researchers are already working on several areas such as voice recognition, miniaturization and modularization in their quest to achieve this goal." If you are interested in an analysis, which provides manufacturers, end users, and other industry participants with an overview, summary, challenges, and latest coverage of Wearable Computing, then send an e-mail to Tori Foster, Corporate Communications, at tori.foster@frost.com . Please include the following information: full name, company name, title, contact telephone number, contact fax number, e-mail. Upon receipt of the above information, an overview will be e-mailed to you. Wearable computing is primarily application driven and targets specific areas that could benefit greatly by its implementation. Recent and significant advances in the miniaturization of electronic components such as processors and sensors as well as in wireless technology are likely to be strong driving forces for its large-scale commercialization. Additionally, the development of electronic textiles and printable electronics has brought researchers closer to achieving true wearability in computing devices. There have also been tremendous advances in the area of context awareness, which is attracting increasing interest due to the ability of context-specific solutions to enhance the capability of wearable computers. Context awareness essentially refers to the sensitivity of the system to temporal and spatial information. It involves an intricate array and network of sensors as well as wireless devices, all of which work in tandem to continuously update users with information based on their current location in space and time. This allows users to access only the most useful and relevant information, thereby enabling them to perform in a more productive manner. However, wearable computers face many challenges that could hinder their eventual use in commercial and real-world applications. Some of the biggest issues relate to heat dissipation and battery power. This is because wearable computers offer "always on" connectivity and therefore require massive amounts of power to constantly transmit and receive information. Finding a source of power that can meet the huge power requirements for such extended usage poses a major concern. The challenge is to create subcomponents that are able to utilize power in a highly effective manner. Considerable improvements in fuel cells could also offer a potential solution to this problem. Another major area of concern is the need to constantly update the user on the context of the situation, which is an information-intensive process. Constantly changing contexts pose a strong challenge to researchers, since they bring into question the ability of wearable computers to keep pace with the resulting information overload. "Providing an efficient processing environment, while taking into account an ergonomic design that enables users to continuously perform their tasks in an uninterrupted manner provides an effective solution to this challenge," notes Janakiraman. "An affordable, robust and context-aware wearable computing platform that provides maximum productivity benefits for enterprises holds the key to large-scale implementation of these systems." Wearable Computing is part of the Electronic Devices Growth Partnership Services Subscription and provides an overview of advances in wearable computing technology along with key drivers, challenges and restraints. It also offers an analysis of wearable computers used in different applications as well as factors impacting their long-term functionality. This research service thoroughly examines the following technologies: e-textiles, printable electronics, embedded electronics, wireless network sensors, rollable and personal display systems, high performance-power ratio processors, heat dissipation, voice-directed wearable computers, 2D holographic imaging, context awareness, and fuel cells. Executive summaries and interviews are available to the press. Technical Insights is an international technology analysis business that produces a variety of technical news alerts, newsletters and research services. Frost & Sullivan, a global growth consulting company, has been supporting clients' expansion for more than four decades. Our market expertise covers a broad spectrum of industries, while our portfolio of advisory competencies includes custom strategic consulting, market intelligence, and management training. Our mission is to forge partnerships with our clients' management teams to deliver market insights and to create value and drive growth through innovative approaches. Frost & Sullivan's network of consultants, industry experts, corporate trainers, and support staff spans the globe with offices in every major country. Wearable Computing D626 Contact: Tori Foster Corporate Communications - North America P: 210.477.8448 F: 210.348.1003 E: tori.foster@frost.com Magdalena Oberland Corporate Communications - Europe P: +44 (0) 20 7915 7876 F: +44 (0) 20 7730 3343 E: magdalena.oberland@frost.com Donna Jeremiah Corporate Communications - Asia Pacific P: +603 6304 5832 F: +603 6201 7402 E: djeremiah@frost.com http://www.frost.com/ http://www.technicalinsights.frost.com/ Keywords in this release: Wearable computing, context awareness, electronic textiles, display systems, voice recognition, miniaturization, modularization, processors, sensors, wireless technology, printable electronics, heat dissipation, battery power, fuel cells Website: http://www.frost.com/ Website: http://www.technicalinsights.frost.com/ Issuers of news releases and not PR Newswire are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content. Terms and conditions, including restrictions on redistribution, apply. 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Textiles fight back in the U S. InTech, Aug 2003 by Fussell, Ellen Going to the front with wearable computers. The textile industry is moving into new territory-military, industrial, and medical applications with smart and electronic textiles (e-textiles). And in doing so, it is accommodating the world textile environment and giving competition in low-wage countries a run for their money. Related Results * Smart fabrics.... * Something up the sleeve:... * NANOSONIC'S E-TEXTILE... * Employing infrared wireless... Most Popular Articles in Technology * Pamela Anderson Wins... * The Best Laptop Bags * SATA vs. PATA: the... * Top Tip: Convert .WMV... Military Research is finding materials to sense chemicals in the air or respond to radioactivity. Researchers are looking for textiles that can be a canvas for a truck and an antenna that sends and receives messages and radio waves. E-textiles are giving firefighters the ability to sense their way through burning buildings. "The most extensive uses will be in industrial applications in which wearable computers can display schematics for construction and maintenance workers, freeing their hands for tasks," said Virginia Tech's Electrical & Computer Engineering ECE Connection article, "Department researchers design e-textiles for computerized clothing & military applications." Virginia Tech researchers are looking into ways to tailor sensors and processing elements to fit the needs of today's users. Advertisement The ability to sense, respond, and adjust to stimuli such as pressure, temperature, or electrical charge is an exciting new field for manufacturers too. Textile engineers, computer scientists, and electrical engineers may one day be able to combine electronics and textile structures to come up with new lightweight and flexible products that manufacturers can make as fast as today's traditional textiles. They might one day be using a flexible, foldable computer keyboard, according to Textiles Industries Media Group (www.textileindustries.com). Some say electrotextile products will show up in new markets-healthcare, entertainment, safety, homeland security, computation, communication, thermal, protective clothing, or even energy harvesting from tensioned structures and other large-area fabrics. Woven fabric structures can also provide a complex network of elaborate electric circuits with electrically conducting and nonconducting constituents, according to Textiles Industries Media Group's Web site. Its structure allows multiple layers and spaces to accommodate electronic devices. Rigid printed circuit boards have wiring layers separated by insulating layers with vias connecting power, ground lines, and wiring of different layers to process and transfer signals. These boards, fabricated using slow photolithography, will soon be defunct, replaced with flexible, stitched, multilayered woven fabric structures manufacturers will be able to produce at speeds of 40 to 100 square meters per hour, depending on weaving speed, pick density, and weaving-machine width. Today, commercial electrically conducting yarns made from metals or polymers coated with metals include short-staple and continuous-filament steel yarns, copper yarns, and silver-coated nylon yarns, according to the site. Thin fibers or filaments make up these yarns, which makes them feel and behave like textile yarns. COMMUNICATE AND INSULATE. Although e-textile opportunities abound in the U.S., the issues are becoming the switching systems and interconnections-doing that within the garments' structure, said Don Thompson, North Carolina State University's (NCSU's) special projects director at the Center for Research on Textile Protection and Comfort. "Putting in wires to carry signals is pretty much doable, but you need ruggedness, and garments are flexible. If people move a lot you have to maintain the suppleness to the connections. People are looking at lots of integrated sensors, wearable computers that go on pockets, on belts, or are connected into systems," he said. By including communications within what you are wearing rather than carrying radios that sense the environment you are in-that is where the value comes in. "If you're a firefighter going into a chemical fire, you have to worry about smoke as well as chemical and thermal threats. If you can monitor the environment as you go in and have that automatically fed back to your commander, the people in control can know what's going on, and they can map it over the whole incident," he said. "You could also have alarms to know if you're getting a more intense thermal threat and if there are more materials coming into the environment that are more threatening." The same goes in a manufacturing environment, "although you'd probably have more limited units-having detection sensors and locators," Thompson said. "If you're out in a unit and you have a sniffer that picks up a leak, then it could provide you with an alarm warning and notify people in control centers in the plant." A communication system in clothing with a microphone built into the collar would give responded the ability to communicate back to home base and vice versa. "If you're responding to a leak, the communications base could direct you with remote sensing to get to the right spot. They can say you need to be 15 meters to your right, and it's on the second level." Textiles fight back in the U.S. InTech, Aug 2003 by Fussell, Ellen
EDP3. Woven Electronics' innovations in conductive fabrics integrate technology into clothing to produce next-generation wearable electronics. Pioneered by Woven engineers and precision crafted on high tech looms, EDP3 represents our wide range of light weight textiles, all of which can be custom configured with any wire type resistive or standard copper. These eTextiles are smart fabrics that are durable and survivable, withstanding rigorous use and persistent cleaning. Readily terminated per client specifications, EDP3 is ready, out-of-the-box, for application in garment manufacturing.
Smart Village at a Glance. IN EGYPT. ( wish it was in INDIA) In line with the turn of a new decade, the Egyptian Government initiated an ambitious modernization plan where its capital of human competencies is set as a first priority and the communications and information technology stands as the key pillar. Stemming from this concept, Smart Villages Company was founded on a Public-Private-Partnership investment model, with 80% ownership to the private sector and 20% to the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology. Smart Location 6 October Smart Village is located in Cairo’s west suburbs and stands as Egypt’s first Technology and Business Park. It is geographically central to all major destinations within Greater Cairo located 20 minutes away from downtown Cairo. Smart Environment Spread over 600 acres the technology hub is hosting a solid cluster of CIT multinational and local companies sharing the ground with Governmental Authorities and Organizations that evenly benefit from a sophisticated state-of the-art infrastructure, up to date facility management and a full range of business and recreation services. The Ministry of Communication and Information Technology (MCIT) has been the key contributor to the success of today’s landmark Smart Village, since its inception, by electing to be Egypt’s flagship Ministry re-locating it’s premises on the site and initiating a large number of Multinational and Local companies to shift their business in Smart Village too. Major top of the line Telecom operators working in Egypt (Telecom Egypt, Mobinil, Vodafone Egypt and Etisalat Egypt) together with CIT giants (Microsoft, Oracle, HP, Alcatel-Lucent, Ericsson) are currently running their business from the Smart Village jointly with numerous large, medium and small size eminent companies in the ICT sector. Smart Infrastructure Smart Village has devoted 90% of its total site to carefully designed green areas, waterfalls and artificial lakes landscape as a background to its pre-conceived contemporary office buildings covering the remaining 10% of the location. A Fiber Optic Network is connecting all the site’s buildings to Telecom Egypt, The Egyptian incumbent operator, and to all the data carriers for international and local connectivity that timely responds to the needs of the operational Communication and Information Technology Companies in Smart Village. Smart Facilities and Supporting Services A consolidated range of services efficiently accommodates the business community served by Smart Villages Company: * Transportation Management ensures the punctual attendance of the employees to their work spaces, shuttle buses operates on a steady and pre-announced schedules both within the 6 October Smart Village premises and back and forth from Cairo aiming to meet with each organization logistics’ requirements. Moreover, limousine service is equally available through out the day. * Fine dinning restaurants and Cafes in Smart Village large Food Court and in-house restaurants & cafeterias serve thousands of employees and visitors all year round. * Security and access control to the premises is equally set as a priority on such a strategic location. * Facility Management secures a reliable and hassle free business environment by applying top of the line practices in cleaning buildings, façades and any related maintenance requirement in addition to the conservation of the site’s landscape. * Smart Village Conference Center provides events hosting capacity for up to 450 participants and offers an exhibition space over more than 1500 square meters. * A full fledge Sporting Club comprising Tennis and Squash Courts, Swimming pools, SPA and Gymnasium, Athletics, Football and multipurpose playgrounds totally dedicated to the fitness of Smart Village community members. * Smart Nursery, a child day care service is contributing to increase the incentive package offered to the families within Smart Village community. * Business Hotel guarantees first class hospitality standards to professional travelers either hosted for few days by partner companies or attending the on going events held in Smart Village Conference & Exhibition Halls. * Onsite availability of: - Banking services and ATM machines - Postal and Parcel delivery services - Travel Agency - Outdoor Signage fabrication - Photocopy Center, Design, Graphic and Printing Agency, - First Aid assistance, plants & flowers delivery. The Financial District Smart Villages Company has moreover capitalized on its successful achievements in the ICT sector to pursue a new correlated project in the financial sector. The 6 October Smart Village will witness very soon the birth of Egypt’s first Financial District where several banks & financial firms have already reserved large land plots to build new branches in Smart Village such as: - Egypt’s Capital Market Authority - Cairo and Alexandria Stock Exchange - The Arab Stock Exchange - The Mortgage Finance Authority - The Egyptian Insurance Supervisory Authority A prospected large mix of various private and public sector entities are moving soon towards Smart Village grounds to benefit from the modern high-tech and professional support in conducting their business, and meanwhile profit from the proximity of all the government regulatory authorities. For further information please visit www.smart-villages.com Indicators | Companies | Associations | Economic Background | Government Incentives | Law 8|Free Zones | Smart Village | Success.
SOME STATISTICS FROM EGYPT. IT MARKET SEGMENTS: Hardware - 72 %. Packaged Software - 16 %. IT Services -12 %. as on 2005. I T Services. Support services - 34 %. Implementation - 17 %. Consulting - 14 % Operations Management - 19 %. Training - 16 %. Labour Force -1/200 = 14,700- Male. 3914 -Female Total = 18617 thousand. - 1/2005 = 16394 -Male. 4732 -Female. Total = 21176 thousand. I T Clubs: Year 2000=120 clubs Tear 2007 =1512 clubs. FOR INFORMATION ONLY.
Thinking of " SMART FABRICS". If your idea of "smart fabrics" is a pair of khaki pants that sheds food stains, think again. The smartest fabrics are becoming electro-active, allowing them to address far more important engineering problems than whether you wear your lunch to an afternoon meeting. These textiles can help you build flexible sensing systems, detect chemicals, generate mobile power and perform other tasks. "More than 70 percent of the surfaces we interact with daily are textiles. Once those textiles can carry data and electrical power, it opens up a huge new world of applications," says Stacey Burr, president of Textronics Inc., a developer of smart fabric technology. Rather than just a single material, electro-active smart fabrics encompass many combinations of textiles and electrically conductive materials. Though often based on elastomeric fibers, like Lycra, smart fabrics can be created from a wide variety of synthetic and even natural fibers. Various knit, woven and non-woven fabrics can all be made smart too. As for the electrical properties, smart fabrics most commonly contain fine metal wires, either in the yarn used to make the fabric or woven into the fabric alongside ordinary textile fibers. Other smart fabrics get their electrical properties from inherently conductive polymers or nanocomposites deposited as coatings on the fabric's fibers. All of these electro-active smart fabrics have a way to go before they become commonplace engineering materials. Some of the textiles, particularly those that rely on nanotechnology, are available only in quantities suitable for development work. Others, while fully commercial, may not have enough of a track record to alleviate the kinds of technical concerns that design engineers bring up within minutes of evaluating a technology. "Smart fabrics are still something of a black art," says Maggie Orth, president and founder of International Fashion Machines, a developer of smart fabric products. Smart-fabric suppliers, for example, all make compelling arguments for the use of their technologies in various sensing systems. But only one company, Nanosonics Inc., would provide technical data related to sensor performance — in this case, strain range, linearity and hysteresis. This lack of basic engineering information may limit the use of smart fabrics somewhat. Spyros Photopoulos, an analyst who studies smart fabric market for Venture Development Corporation (VDC), recently surveyed OEMs regarding their plans for using smart fabrics and found that many expressed doubts about the durability and performance of smart fabrics. "Price is also a big issue," he says. "Many OEMs wouldn't consider smart fabric technology without strong consumer demand." Smart fabrics may also suffer from a disconnect within the design community. As Burr notes, "electrical engineers and textile designers don't speak the same language." And bringing these two groups together goes beyond semantics. Engineers need to know how to physically integrate fabrics with traditional rigid electronics, which requires new approaches to interface and interconnect designs. Fabrics get smart. Electro-active textiles serve as switches,sensors and more.... Joseph Ogando -Senior Editor Design News. SWITCHES AND CONTROLS. The smart fabric applications that have currently moved along the furthest in a commercial sense have involved switches and controls for consumer electronics. The leader in this field, Eleksen Ltd., has supplied touch-sensitive fabric controls for products ranging from electronics cases to ski jackets with integrated, machine-washable controls for audio players. The company also developed portable wireless fabric keyboards that you can roll, fold or even crumple. Eleksen makes these fabric controls from a multilayered fabric containing three electro-active layers. Two outer conductive layers surround an inner resistive layer that separates the conductive layers until someone presses them together. As Andrew Newman, one of the technology's developers, explains, "the fabric is basically an open circuit until someone presses the fabric." Eleksen then measures the voltage drop at various points on the surfaces to determine where and how hard someone presses the fabric. "We measure the interaction in the x, y and z directions," says Newman, who adds that the z-axis measurement gives a relative, rather than an absolute, pressure reading. The company can supply a variety of configurations, including single switches or arrays of switches on a given fabric surface. The company's keyboards, for example, take the latter approach. Newman notes that Eleksen's fabric, which it calls Elek Tex, and the related electronics, output an analog signal. So the same technology can also be used for sliding control buttons, such as those used for volume or scrolling on a computer display. While current Elek Tex applications have focused squarely on consumer electronics, Newman sees some potential for a variety of human-machine interface applications. In automotive interiors and appliances, the technology could be used for software-configurable control panels that can cover even deeply curved surfaces. In one of the only real indications of smart fabric durability, Eleksen has carried out extensive mechanical testing of its products, including subjecting them to 10 million press cycles and hysteresis tests after 30,000 roll-ups and folding cycles. "That's far in excess of what they would see in real life," says Newman. (see http://rbi.ims.ca/4922-562 for the company's reference designs). Soure: International Fashion Machines.
Another switch application comes from International Fashion Machines. Orth has re-imagined the ordinary household light switch as a capacitive touch sensor in the shape of a pom-pom. At first glance, pom-pom switches may seem too frivolous for Design News'practical readers. But consider this: Orth gets $129 for her light switch, which has appeared in museum shows, compared to about two bucks for the ugly plastic commodity versions down at the hardware store. "Smart fabrics allowed me to create a premium product," she says. She's also managed to get UL approval for her switch, no easy task. SENSE STRAIN AND MORE For engineers, one of the biggest technical potentials for smart fabrics relates to their ability to sense strain and serve as the basis for pressure monitoring systems. Both broad types of smart fabric — those based metal wires and those based on inherently conductive polymers or nanocomposites — can perform some sensing. Whatever the type of fabric, they tend to operate on the fabric equivalent of the piezoresistive principle. With fabrics based on metal wires, such as those offered by Textronics, the movement of the fabric itself brings conductive metal fibers closer together or further apart, altering the resistance of the fabric. Something similar happens with fibers infused with ICP or nanocomposites, in that strain changes the electron transport between conductive clusters on the fabric fiber. With some signal processing, these resistance changes can be translated into pressure measurements. "In theory, you can turn all kinds of resistive materials into strain sensors," says Orth. Two of the newest ways to create fabric sensors rely on nanotechnology to make polymer fabric fibers conductive to varying degrees. Nanosonic Inc. recently developed smart fabrics based on an electrostatic self-assembly process. (see http:// rbi.ims.ca/4922-563). Initially developed to make free-standing elastomeric sensor films, the self-assembly process can infuse the surface of textile fibers with various nanocomposites — combinations of polymers and metals or metal oxides. Fabrics made from these fibers have high conductivity, with bulk resistivity values down to 10-5 ohm cm, according to Andrea Hill, the Nanosonics researcher who helped develop the conductive fabrics. At the same time, they also can tolerate extreme elongations. Rick Claus, Nanosonics president and founder, notes that the original sensor films, called Metal Rubber, can measure strains up to 1,000 percent with full scale linearity of 1 percent. At lower strains, they can tolerate thousands of flex cycles and exhibit low mechanical hysteresis, he adds. The brand new fabric versions, dubbed Metal Rubber Textiles, can tolerate similarly large strains. Another twist on inherently conducting fibers comes from Eeonyx. The company has a proprietary process for coating textiles with inherently conductive polymers based on doped polypyrrole. The company polymerizes the materials in situ — or on the surface of the fabric itself — so that the coating material fills interstices in the surface and forms a physical bond with the fibers. Jamshid Avloni, the company's president, reports that the ICP doesn't offer conductivity near the level offered by metal wires. But, then again, it doesn't have to. "There are orders of magnitude of different between the conductivity of, say, polyester and copper," says Avloni. "We occupy a middle ground." The company can deliver fabrics, for example, with surface resistivities ranging from 10 to 106 ohm/sq, controllable to within 10 percent. Avloni says the textiles have seen some use in piezoresistive pressure sensing applications, including a dynamic pressure sensor for biomedical applications and the design of custom footwear. Neither the Nanosonic nor the Eeonyx technology changes the fabric properties much, if at all. "You still get the drape and feel of a fabric," Avloni says of Eeontex. The conductive treatments can also be translucent enough to avoid much of a visual impact — though some versions of the Eeonyx coating formulations are black. The two nanotech approaches have a downside too. Metal Rubber Textiles and Eeontex are currently available in quantities that many large OEMs would consider developmental. What's more, Eeontex has issues with long-term stability owing to the hydrolysis of polypyrrole when exposed to elevated temperatures and humid conditions. The company recently developed a third-generation product that improves stability by a factor of 20, according to Avloni. And the fabrics can be protected with a laminate. But environmental conditions still represent the chief failure mode for the ICP and need to be accounted for by design engineers, he acknowledges. "Metal wires have their problems too," he adds. "If you bend them enough, they'll break." In many sensing applications, smart fabrics won't likely represent a low-cost alternative to an array of pressure transducers. Yet even if they aren't cheapest way to sense pressure, fabric sensors can potentially offer value by brining more freedom to the design of sensing systems. Fabrics can covering very large areas, including civil structures. They can conform to a wide variety of surfaces, including the human body while it's moving. And they may be able to measure very large strains. Textronic's Burr notes that elastomeric smart fabrics tolerate repeated elongations up to a few hundred percent. These fabric attributes may result in other types of unique sensors in the future. Textronics, for example, is working on electro-optical movement sensors for medical monitoring applications. As Burr explains, these sensors integrate a light source and photodetector into the fabric. As the fabric stretches and returns to its initial shape, different amounts of light would pass through the fabric's woven or knit structure. Burr says one application for such an optical sensor would be a garment that monitors a patient's breathing. Textronics also recently introduced a biomonitoring product for the consumer market. She also sees the potential for both optical and strain-based measurements of movement and vibration. And Nanosonic's Claus reveals that the company has come up with a proprietary chemical sensors based on smart fabrics. He's not ready to publicly disclose much about it, other than to say that it works based on electro-chemical reactions of a nanoclusters on the fabric surface.
Eat your P C. Toyota,Sony,Fujitso - PUSH BIO PLASTICS Doug Smock Contributing Editor design news April 20,2007. One of these days you may be able to have your notebook PC and eat it too. There’s a dramatic move under way to develop plastics that use plants as feedstocks. Engineering versions of these plastics, at least for now, also contain traditional petrochemical feedstocks in order to maintain stiffness, durability and other properties needed for technical applications. Of course they’re not edible, but they can stand up to the shock of a drop test. Bioplastics come from plant sources such as hemp oil, soy bean oil and corn starch. They first came into vogue about 15 years ago as a proposed solution to solid waste problems until an “urban archaeologist” named William L. Rathje from the University of Arizona reported that waste does not degrade in a properly designed landfill. In fact, just the opposite is desired to keep toxic materials from leaching into aquifers. Plastics made from plants are getting a new push today for a variety of reasons: * Growing concern about global warming is triggering interest in products that reduce carbon dioxide emissions. One metric ton of bioplastics generates between 0.8 and 3.2 fewer metric tons of carbon dioxide than one metric ton of petroleum-based plastics. * The price of oil, and consequently the price of oil-, or natural gas-, based plastics has become extremely unstable. The huge spike in plastics prices two years ago ruined many corporate budgets. Costs of plant-based feedstocks are also rising, triggered in part by the ethanol boom, but they are more predictable than oil-based feedstocks. * Brand-new versions of plastics are hybrids of oil- and plant-based feedstocks preserve property benefits of existing polymers such as PBT or nylon, and actually provide some improvements, particularly in surface finish. The gorilla in the room is still costs. Because these hybrid engineering materials are just moving out of the lab, they are much more expensive to produce than current plastics. Major developers, such as DuPont, are committed to the future of the market and plan to offer hybrid materials at reasonably cost competitive levels until the market matures, when prices could actually be under oil-based materials. Three are at least three chemical families of bioplastics. Some bioplastics are made directly from starch and are used for applications such as drug capsules. Organic additives such as sorbitol and glycerine aid processing. Another, polylactic acid (PLA), comes from polymerized lactic acid produced by fermenting starch contained in sweet corn and other plants. PLA is already widely used for biodegradable medical implants and packaging. A third bioplastic poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) has properties comparable to polypropylene. Booming demand is triggering expanded capacity of both feedstocks and polymer. Sugar producers in South America, also primary sources of material used to make ethanol, announced large capacity increases. One analyst predicts that prices for PHB will drop below 60 cents per pound. The Greening of Japan. The most exciting developments today are in Japan, where three recently passed laws are fueling development: the Law on Promoting Green Purchasing, the Law for the Promotion of Effective Utilization of Resources, and the Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (PRTR) Law. One of the leading players is Fujitsu, which is using a PLA hybrid developed by Toray Industries to make the housing for its FMV-BIBLO notebook PC series Introduced two years ago. The Toray material, called Ecodear, is aimed at fibers, textiles, molded parts and films. Fujitsu and Toray first attacked the problem in 2002 with a pure PLA. The material, however, lacked adequate flame retardance and was not moldable because of its low temperature resistance. They decided to combine PLA (50 percent) with a proprietary amorphous oil-based plastic to achieve the required properties. Toray is now bringing on line a $9-million plant in South Korea to produce PLA. Annual capacity is 5,000 metric tons a year. Korean packaging converter Saehan is a 10 percent investor. Packaging in South Korea is now being rapidly converted to biodegradable PLA, a trend still in its nascent stage in the United States. Toray is also developing nano additives to use in PLA film. One interesting note: until recently PLA was only used because it is biodegradable. The Fujitsu hybrid material is not biodegradable. In fact, Fujitsu does not want the notebooks placed in landfills, where toxic metals could cause pollution. The goal is to increase recycling of the plastic components. Just recently, Fujitsu announced another turn. The company is now developing with French chemical producer Arkema a bioplastic based on castor oil that provides more flexibility than can be achieved with corn-derived plastics. The goal is to expand use of bioplastics in notebook computers. Castor oil is used because it is a source of nylon (polyamide) 11. A Fujitsu spokesman commented: “By weakening the interaction of the chain molecule in PA-11 and relaxing the stereoregularity of their organization, the resulting new material has sufficient flexibility to withstand repeated bending without causing the whitening that often occurs when such materials are strained.” Prototypes of PC cover components consist of 60-80 percent of the new bioplastic, an unparalleled achievement to date. High-density fillers are added to increase strength. Fujitsu’s goal is to use the materials for notebook covers, and other applications requiring high impact resistance. Fujitsu also hopes to begin using the material in mobile phone covers too. The new material cuts carbon dioxide emissions 42 percent compared to oil-based nylon 6/6, according to Thomas Grimaud, Arkema’s technical polymers business manager. Arkema’s new Rilsan PA 11 is now approved in fuel lines that carry biofuels in Europe and Brazil. The main driver in this development is performance. The new Rilsan is said to provide improved resistance over time to the aggressive attack of biofuels compared to polyamide 12. Interestingly, Rilsan PA 11 is not a new material. “We’ve been making it for over 50 years,” says Todd Rogers a market development official with Arkema. “We’ve always made it with castor oil because of the enhanced properties castor oil provides.” It’s widely used in oilfield applications as well as automotive brake lines. Earlier this year, a German-based automotive supplier called Fraenkische announced the launch of enhanced safety fuel lines for fuel pump modules using technology based on Rilsan polyamide 11. The new fuel lines comply with the SAE J1645 automotive standard which is designed to increase passenger safety by inhibiting spark ignition in the fuel system, thus decreasing the risk of accidents. General Motors has already replaced its non-conductive fuel-pump modules for new North American car models. There was no environmental angle – it was the best material for the job. Rogers says. However, that new focus on sustainable resources is creating increased interest in the material. Its high cost, about $6 a pound, will limit its use. The Japanese push, however, is clearly tied to green goals. Kenaf Reinforcements NEC Corp., is using a PLA-based plastic reinforced with kenaf fibers to make the entire case of a mobile phone for NTT DoCoMo, Japan’s largest mobile communications company. The kenaf fiber provides strength, allowing a significantly greater percentage of bioplastic – 90 percent. "About 75 percent of the surface area in this (phone), excluding the areas surrounding the screen and keys, is made of kenaf fiber-reinforced bioplastic," says Yusuke Moriyama, assistant manager of the Product Planning Department in the Mobile Terminals Div., NEC. The “Eco Mobile” phone uses a textured look to create a “natural” design, says Katsuhiko Hirosawa, who is in charge of Eco Mobile product planning at NTT DoCoMo. The phone was initially targeted at young women and was available only in pink. The plastic in the phone was developed with a Japanese materials development company called Unitika, which produces a PLA plastic trademarked Terramac. Its melting point is 170C. Impact strength (ISO179 ) is 5.6. Sony is also involved. Hiroyuki Mori, a senior eco-material engineer, says Sony is using several small components based on PLA, but is looking for higher performance. Sony’s studies indicate that a PLA-based polymer could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 20 percent and non-renewable resource input by 55 percent compared to ABS. In the U.S., the leading technology developer for engineering applications appears to be DuPont, which announced at NPE 2006 plans to develop plant-based grades of Sorona polytrimethylene terephthalate and Hytrel. elastomer using propanediol (PDO) derived from corn sugar. DuPont says its diol feedstock combined with its polymerization experience allows creation of a polymer with superior physical characteristics than competing bioplastics. The new Sorona will provide good stiffness and strength. Joe Kurian, the technology and business development manager for DuPont’s bio-derived technologies, says the new sorona has better surface appearance and gloss thanPBT polybutylene terephthalate. Sorona Will Be Cost Competitive The new Sorona grade will be a hybrid polymer, with about 37-40 percent of the content from renewable resources, such as corn. “I think we can go to 50-60 percent with the technologies that are available to use,” Kurian said in an interview with Design News. Target markets are automotive, appliances and connectors. Customers are testing the materials now. Commercial launch is expected before the end of the year. “Our goal is to provide products at prices that people can afford, not multiples of two or three times,” says Kurian. No new investment in equipment or tooling will be required to use DuPont’s new Sorona, says Kurian. Sorona was introduced a few years ago as an oil-based material for textile and fiber markets. Feedstocks are being switched to the plant-based materials. The physical properties of the new Hytrel grade will be very comparable to the current oil-based Hytrel. Biomaterials will vary 35 percent to 65 percent of the compound, depending on the grade. With Tate & Lyle , DuPont has built the world’s largest aerobic fermentation plant in Loudon, TN for the production of bio-PDO. Capacity is 45,000 metric tons a year. Sorona polymer ispolymerizing Bio-PDOwith either terephthalic acid (TPA) or dimethyl terephthalate (DMT)at the DuPont plant in Kinston, NC. DuPont is expanding capacity in Kinston and in a plant in China. In another development, Procter & Gamble and Kaneka are engaged in a joint development agreement to commercialize a polymer calledNodax H, which is a poly (3-hydroyxbutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate). P&G declined to comment for this article. Here’s a Rundown of Other U.S. Players: NatureWorks LLC (Minnetonka, MN) is a stand-alone company wholly owned by Cargill. Dow Chemical 7as a partner at one time. NatureWorks LLC says it is the first company to offer a family of commercially available greenhouse-gas-neutral polymers derived from 100 percent annually renewable resources with cost and performance that compete with petroleum-based packaging materials and fibers. The companies uses unique technology to process natural plant sugars into a polylactide polymer. The polymer is said to provide gloss and clarity similar to polystyrene, and exhibits tensile strength and modulus comparable to hydrocarbon-based thermoplastics. Target applications are various types of packaging. The company is in the early stages of establishing a recycling stream for bottles made from PLA. NatureWorks produces PLA at a plant (140,000 tons per year) in Blair, NB., and says it has reduced costs to be competitive with petroleum-based polymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET). NatureWorks supplies about 90 percent of the commercial polymer lactic acid market and has distribution agreements with other companies that produce polymers from PLA. Metabolix (Cambridge, MA) is partnering with Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) to build a plant in Clinton, IA, to produce 110 million pounds of plastic based on polyhydroxybutyric acid (PHA). The Metabolix plasticsare produced from genetically engineered microbes. Much of the core technology isowned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and exclusively licensed to Metabolix. The MIT license covers 11 issued U.S. patents, one U.S. application and numerous foreign counterparts. In the future, Metabolix says its plastics will be produced in growing plants, making them cost competitive with plastic such as polyethylene. Cereplast has a compounding plant in Hawthorne, CA, with a capacity of 50 million pounds to manufacture PLA-based plastics made from corn and/or potato starch. Capacity is being quadrupled, partly in response to new state laws on the West Coast targeting litter waste. Market development has focused on disposable packaging such as foodware, but the company says its products may be used for mechanical design applications. At this time there are no such applications for the company’s polymers, which are best suited for applications where packaging can be disposed in a composting facility. Novomer (Ithaca, NY) is working with Kodak to develop commercial plastics based on a technology developed by a Cornell University research team headed by Professor Geoffrey Coates. The company synthesizes aliphatic polycarbonates (APCs) using carbon dioxide as a raw material with either petrochemical epoxides or limonene oxide derived from citrus fruits.The Novomer APCs are biodegradable, biocompatible, are optically clear and provide high oxygen and water barrier. Potential applications include drug delivery, construction of flexible electronic screens using light-emitting devices, polymer-based electrolytes and polyurethane foams that are up to 40 percent by mass carbon dioxide. High-end applications are targeted because of the potential high cost of the polymer.
(WHAT IS OUR DEVELOPMENT POLICY for 2008) Textile Industry Development Policy 2007 : Tax incentives to attract FDI in textile sector Date: 03/08/2007 ISLAMABAD: The proposed Textile Industry Development Policy 2007 is expected to offer four tax incentives to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) in upcoming textile and garment cities, a senior official at the Ministry of Textile Industry (MINTEX) told Daily Times on Wednesday.Among its proposals to the tax authorities, MINTEX proposed that all import of textile machinery and raw material should be duty-free to facilitate import of the latest textile machinery, which would prove to be a big incentive for the textile sector to enhance its production capacity. At present, tax authorities are charging a minimum of five percent custom duty on the import of machinery. MINTEX has also proposed tax-free procurement of machinery and raw material from the domestic market so that the production capacity is expanded. The proposed incentives include a general sales tax exemption on utilities to those investing in upcoming textile and garment cities.The government has already allowed general sales tax at zero rating on electricity and gas consumed in the production process of the textile sector. At present, it is establishing garment and textile cities in Karachi, Lahore and Faisalabad to ensure enhanced value-addition and export surplus in the country. Exports of textile products amounted to $10.757 billion in 2006-07 increasing by 5.27 percent from $10.218 billion in the previous year.The government has fixed a growth target of 12 percent for textile exports for the current fiscal year 2007-08.
( How much more our Industrialists are getting ) Incentives to the Industrialists Last updated: 2007-05-29 Government of Pakistan has taken various initiatives/steps to boost the textile sector and to make it compatible with the other global competitors in the end of quota regime. Establishment of Federal Textile Board to take decisions for the development of textile industry. * Establishment of Federal Textile Board to take decisions evolving strategy for the development of textile industry. * Campaign launched for the production of contamination free cotton & subsequent promulgation of amendment in Cotton Control Act 1966. * Policy support in shifting towards value addition. * Establishment of Textile City at Karachi and Garment Cities at Karachi, Lahore & Faisalabad. * Gradual reduction of import duty on textile machinery and parts to 5% ad valorem except spinning rings on which it is 10%. * Sales tax on the import and local supply of major inputs/raw materials utilized in the entire manufacturing regime of textile Industry, have been zero rated. * Import duty on raw material, sub-components and components used in the local manufacturing of textile plants and machinery for export sector, has been reduced to zero% (SOR565(1)/2005). * Import duty on ginning presses has been reduced to 5%. * Turn over tax has been reduced to 1% on retailers of specified textile fabrics and articles of apparel including readymade garments or fashion wear. The 15% Sales Tax levied earlier on retailers has been reduced to 2%. Both these taxes will be their final tax liability. * Custom Duty, sales tax and withholding income tax on raw materials for the manufacture of textile has been zero rated at the import stage to do away with the duty drawback / refund claims under the revised and simplified DTRE Scheme. * R&D support of 6% on garments and 3% on Dyed/Printed Fabrics and white-Home Textiles. * Amendments in labour laws & factories act to make them ILO & ATC compliant Textile Package * State bank of Pakistan will provide long-term financing for export oriented projects at reduced mark up of 7% and 6% for 7 year and 3year period respectively. It has also simplified the procedure. * The re-financing rate has been reduced to 7.5% from 9%. * R&D support @ 6% shall be continued to be given to Ready Made Garments and Knitwear exports. In addition, R&D support will also be available for exports of the following:- a) Dyed/Printed Fabrics and white-Home Textiles @ 3% b) Dyed/Printed Home Textiles @ 5% * A committee is being formed to explore the possibility of re-inclusion of fabrics in SRO-410. * A Committee is being formed to consider zero duty on import of weaving machines and spare parts. * A Committee has been formed to examine actual zero rating of all textiles & clothing exports. Page Options Copyright © 2002 - 2007 Ministry of Textile Industry | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
PROJECTS IN CHINA. # Government Projects Countermeasure Research of WTO National Bilateral Textile and Apparel Trade Negotiation Client: China National Development and Reform Committee International Competition Research of China Textile Industry Client: Ministry of Finance # Private Sector Projects U.S. Cotton Export to China Supply Chain Database Study Client: CCI (US) China High-Grade Casual Wear Market Research Client: Germany BOGNER Domestic Casual Wear Market Research Client: Germany TOM TAILOR Beijing Underwear Market Research Client: Antai Group Current Use and Market Outlook of Automatic Equipment in China Printing and Dyeing Industry Client: U.S. X-Rite Co., Ltd. Development Tendency of Garment Fabric in China Market and Washing Habits Client: Unilever Research of Beijing Residents’ Cotton Garment Consumption Client: China Cotton Textile Association
Textination. ( A new word for us ) Textination - Connecting the World of Textiles ... Textination is the vertical internet portal for the textile business. The bilingual (German/English) platform offers numerous ways of information and e-commerce for companies of textile, ready-made clothing and retail on one site. A comprehensive Suppliers A-Z supports the fast and intransitive developing of contact, while the electronic marketplace creates additional opportunities of sales (B2B) in the textile world. Whether news from current economic events, trade fair dates, seminars and exhibitions, or Jobs & Career – it’s all on www.textination.de. Partners are, among others, the Confederation of the German Textile and Fashion Industry, its regional and professional associations, the Federation of the German textile retail (BTE), the Association of the Austrian textile industry, as well as Federation of the Swiss textile and clothing industry.
If you have come here, you have to Relax but take your time to answer these 'QUIZ'. What is the correct word to describe a tropical revolving storm? a) Typhoon b) Reppu c) Cyclone How fast can a tsunami traval? a) Faster than a speeding car b) Faster than a bullet train c) Faster than a jet aeroplane Hurricanes only form a) At full moon b) When sea temperatures reach 26.5 degrees c) At the equator Which natural disaster cannot be the result of a volcanic eruption? a) Lightning b) Tsunami c) Tornado Where is the best place to hide during an earthquake? a) The open air b) Under the bed c) A car Answers : In the guest Book.
Depressed An estimated 15 million Americns are affected. The following questionnaire may hel identify symptoms of depression.Don't try to skip any question,as it may lead o wrong conclusion.However,it's advisible to seek medical openion for a proper diagnosis. 1.-During the past two weeks,I have been feeling low / irritable much of the time,on most days Agree Disagree 2.-Of late I have noticed that I don't get as much satisfaction out of pleasurable activities,be it hobbies,socialising or sex,as I used to Agree Disagree 3.- Nowadays I put off decision-making more often than I used to as I find it difficult to focus or concentrate Agree Disgree 4.-Does any of the following apply to you? * I don't sleep as well as usual * I wake up much earlier than I used to and find it difficult to get back to sleep * It takes me hours to sleep if I go bed in time * I over sleep most of the time Agree Disgree 5.-Of late,I have felt that it takes me more effort to get started with some work than usual Agree Disgree 6.-I have gained / lost weight significantly over the past two weeks. Agree Disagree 7.-Of late my appetite has changed Agree Disgree 8.-I am getting more tired or fatigued than I used to earlier 9.-I feel excessively guilty or worthless If things don't go as planned Agree Disgree 10.-I feel particularly discouraged about the future.I had recurrent thoughts of dying Agree Disgree Scoring Key Score 1 each if your responce is'agree' and score 0 each if your responce is 'disagree' Analysis From 1-4 - points - Mildly indicative of low mood.Might also be due to situational factors in current life scenario 5-7 points - Indicates slightly depressed mood.If not taken care of,it can progress to a state of depression. Persons falling in this range are prone to the ups and downs of life and exibit a few symptoms of depression which if prolonged, may lead to a clinically significant state of depression. More than 7 points - Indicates a state wherein a person may feel dejected,helpless/ hopeless or"down in the dumps".It may manifest as bodily complaints such as achs and pains,if proper attention is not paid at the right time. It might also represent a state of clinically significant depression wherein psychological consultation is suggested.
Calorie Counter. Rice - 1 Cup= 170Calories Chapathi - 1 = 80 Calories. Paratha - 1 = 150 Calories. Puri - 1 = 100 Calories. Bread - 2 slices = 170 Calories. Poha - 1 Cup = 270 Calories. Upma - 1 Cup = 270 Calories. Idli - 2 = 150 Calories. Dosa - = 125 Calories Kichdi - = 125 Calories Cornflakes with milk - = 220 Calories PULSES Plain dal - 1/2 Cup = 100 Calories. Sambar - 1 Cup = 110 Calories. VEGETARIAN. Vegetable with gravy - 1 Cup = 170 Calories. Vegetable dry - 1 Cup = 150 Calories. SNACKS. Bhajiya / pakora - 8 pieces = 280 Calories. Cheese balls - 2 = 250 Calories. Dahi Vada - 2 = 140 Calories Vada - 2 = 180 Calories. Masala Dosa - 1 = 200 Calories Potato bonda/vada - 2 = 200 Calories. Vegetable samosa - 1 = 200 Calories. Sandwiches(with butter) - 2 = 200 Calories. Vegetable puff - 1 = 170 Calories. Pizza - 1 Slice = 200 Calories. CHUTNEYS Coconut chutney - 2 tbsp = 120 Calories Tomoto Chutney - 2 tbsp = 20 Calories. SWEETS & DESSERTS. Besan barfi - 2 pieces = 400 Calories. Chikki - 2 pieces = 290 Calories. Fruit Cake - 1 pieces = 270 Calories. Sandesh - 2 pieces = 140 Calories. Kesari halva - 1/2Cup = 320 Calories. Jelly or Jam - 1 tsp = 20 Calories Caramel custard - 1/2 Cup = 160 Calories. Shrikhand - 1/2 Cup = 380 Calories. Milk chocolate - 25 gms = 140 Calories. Ice-cream - 1/2 cup =200 Calories.
INDUSTRIAL PARKS IN CHINA. China Knowledge This groundbreaking guide is the fruit from three years of intensive research, which includes the visiting of various industrial parks in China. A unique rating system assesses each and every industrial park based on location, development, costs of investments, human resource and management skills. Investors will be able to easily pick the industrial park that best suits their business needs. Building A Successful Plant In China also delves into China's macro- and micro-economy, its flourishing key industries, general investment environment, as well as the business climate in its municipalities and provinces.
A few Quotes When a man opens the door of his car for his wife,you can be sure of one thing:either the car is new or his wife. 'We cannot do great things,'We can only do little things with great love.-'Mother 'Teresa 'For every action there is an equal and opposite criticism. Liberty is the breath of life to nations.-George 'Bernard Shaw 'There's no place like 'No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.-Charles 'Dickens Goodness is the only investment that never fails.-Henry "David 'Thoreau
ESSENTIAL NUTRIENTS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS
Compond
Vitamin B 12
Major Actions
Essential role in the synthesis of DNA in the cell nucleus Required for proper funtioning of the CNS and the metabolism of folic acid
Normal Dai;y Requirements-1/mg/day
Dietary Source-Mainly animal sources,Cheese and milk.Not in vegetables.
Dificency Symptoms-Megaloblastic anaemia,Glossitis,Nerological S/S eg, neuropathy SACD of spinal card.
Dosage in dificiency states-IM:100/mg/day till remession.Then 50/mg/day every 2 weeks
Overdosage- COMPOND Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid)
Normal Daily Requirement-50/mg/day Dietary Source-Fresh Fruits(citrus)Vegetables(green)Sproted pulses and beans,amla,guava Dificiency symptoms. Scury Weekness,bleeding gums Defective bone growth F0llicular hyperkeratosis Oral lessions Dossage in deficienccy states 300 mg/day children 1 gm/day adults Overdossage Precipitation of oxalate,urate or cysteine stones in the urine Compound Vitamin D Required for bone growt & calcium metabolism Plays an important role in the absorption of dietary Ca from the intestine and its deposition in bone Normal daily requirements 200-400I U /day for children Dietary source Ultraviolet rays help in Vit D formation in the skin Not rich in dietary intake Deficiency Symptoms Rickets & Osteomalacia are the most important features of Vit D deficiency in children & adults resp Dossage in deficieency States Rickets 40.000 I U.inj (2-3 injections) Osteomalacia 60.000 I U daily with calcium orally Overdosage Irrtability Nausea Vomiting Constipation Weakness of muscles Impaired renal function Componud Vitamin E Major Actions Acts as an antioxidant inhabiting the peroxidation of fatty acids and Vit A & fats.It helps to favourably influence the cardiac statius,physical endurence,potency,fertility& longevity Normal daily requirments 5mg/day Dietary Sources Codliver oil Vegetable oil Deficency symptoms Diaffuse muscular atrophy exudative diathesis encephalomalacia anaemia & oedema in children Dossage in deficiency states 25-200mg/day COMPOND Vitamin K Major Actions Acts at the ribossomal level in the liver to control prothrombin synthe- sis Maintains factors VII,IX,X Normal daily requirements Green Leafy Vegetables intestinal bacteria Deficiency Symptoms Bleeding disorders Dossage in deficiency states Infants at birth are given a single IM inj of 1mg of Vit K Overdossage. Compound VITAMIN -A (Ratinol) Major Actions Necessary for clear vision in dim light Maintains the integrety of epithelial tissues & necessary for optimal growth Normal daily requirements 750mg/day 1200mg for pregnent & lactating females Dietary source Liver oils of fishes like cod, halibut,shark,& saw fish Milk,curd,egg,yolk,liver, bytter,ghee,green leafy vegetables like spinach, amaranth,coriander,drumstick leaves,cury leaves, mint raddish leaves,Rice, yellow fruits like mangoes, papaya,tomotos.carrots & yellow pumpkin Red palm oil Deficiency symptoms Night blindness Xeratomalacia Impaired physical growth Rough & dry skin Dosage in deficiency states Two Oral doses of 2,00,000 IU at 6 monthly interval or I/M 1,00,000 IU twice a year Overdosage Toxic symptom like irritability.nausea vomiting & constip ation,anorexia, pigmentation,scaling of the skin COMPOUND VITAMIN - B1 (Thiamine) Major Actions Proper utilization of carbohydrates in the body plays an important role in the oxidation and decarboxylation of pyruvic acid and other ketoacids. Normal daily requirements 0.5 - 2.0mg/d Dietary source Yeast & the outer layer of cereals like rice,wheat & millets,pulses & nuts, particularly ground nut Deficiency Symptoms Dry beri beri:loss of appetite,tingling, numbness in legs hands & footdrop Wet beri beri:dropsy palpitation,breathlessness & weakness of the heart leading to heart failure. Dosage in deficiency states. I/M injection of B1 25-50mg daily for 3 days then 10mg x TDS orally till convalescnce Overdosage The above is in case of essential vitamins other nutrients are given later. Source - DRUG INDEX, July-Sept,1997. Consult your Doctor befour any action.
The health benefits of corn.
Corn is high in nutrients.A few of these important nutrient are: *Thiamin(Vitamin B1) which is used in the metabolism of carbohydrates. *Pantothenic acid(vitamin B5) which helps with physiological functions. *Folate which helps the generation of new cells - especially important before and during pregnacy. *Vitamin C which fights against diseases. A good source of fibre.
*One cup of corn provides 18.4 per cent of the daily recommendation of fibre. This is one of the biggest benefits of corn. Fibre has been shown to help lower cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of colon cancer. Fibre is also useful in lowering sugar levels in diabetics. Add more corn to your diet. *How do you get the benefits of corn when it's not mid-summer and corn on the cob is not plentiful? You can still gain from corn frozen when it is fresh. *Try corn as a side dish sauteed with green chilies and onions. *Add frozen corn to soup,chili and chowder.Use corn tortillas instead of flour tortillas.The addition of corn a couple of times a week to your diet will have healthful benefits.
At a Glance. Course:Bread. Type of Prep:Fry. Cuisine:Mexican. CORN TORTILLAS Easy corn tortillas from Judy Howle. INGREDIENTS: * 2 cups instant corn flour (masa harina) * 1 1/3 cups warm water PREPARATION: Heat griddle (preferably non-stick or seasoned iron) over medium heat and have ready. Mix corn flour and warm water to form soft dough. Pinch off pieces and form into smooth balls with the palms of your hands. Keep remaining dough covered with a damp cloth to prevent drying. Open tortilla press and lay a plastic sandwich bag on the bottom half. Place ball of dough on the plastic, a little off-center, towards the hinge of the press. Place another sandwich bag on top of the ball and flatten slightly with your hand. Close the press firmly, then open. Dampen hands with a little water. Peel the top bag off the tortilla, then lift the bottom plastic bag up with the tortilla still on it. Transfer the tortilla, dough side down, to your dampened hand. With free hand, carefully peel the bag off the dough. Note: If the dough is thick and grainy, a little more water may be needed. If it sticks to the plastic or your hand, it is too wet and a little more flour may be added. Always keep hands damp with water when handling dough. Place the tortilla on the hot griddle and cook turning only once, like a pancake. This should take about 2 minutes. Note from Judy: Turn a third time and press firmly in the center of the tortilla to make it puff up.
THIS RECIPE FOR CRANBERRY LOVERS. This cranberry rice recipes is packed with flavor. Serve this rice with pork or chicken for a delicious meal. INGREDIENTS: * 1 tablespoon olive oil * 1 teaspoon butter * 1 medium onion, finely chopped * 1 cup brown rice or a blend of brown and wild rice * 2 cups chicken broth * 1/4 teaspoon salt * 1/8 teaspoon pepper * 1 cup frozen chopped spinach, thawed * 2 teaspoons curry powder blend, or to taste * 1/2 cup dried cranberries PREPARATION: In a medium saucepan over medium heat, saute the onion in olive oil and butter. When onion is tender, add the rice and cook for about 1 minute longer, stirring constantly. Add chicken broth, salt, and pepper. Cover and cook for 30 minutes. Add remaining ingredients and continue cooking until rice is tender, about 10 to 15 minutes longer. Taste and adjust seasonings. Serves 4.
ESSENTIAL NUTRIENTS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Compound:Riboflavin Major actions: Essential for several oxidation processes inside cells and is concerned with energy & protein metabolism Normal daily requirements: o.7 - 2mg/day Dietary Source: Milk & milk products including skimmed milk,curd,cheese & whey) eggs & liver. Deficiency Symptoms: Soreness of the tongue(glossitis) cracking at the angles of the mouth (angular stomatitis) Dosage in deficiency states:5mg TDS orally Over dosage: Consult your doctor in case of Deficiency Symptoms.
Want to learn HTML - Buy the Book - HTML FOR THE WORLD WIDE WEB - VISUAL QUICKSTART GUIDE - BY - ELIZABETH CASTRO. (I did't buy my son presented to me seeing me struggling to learn free from web)
DIGITAL PRINTS DIGITAL PRINTS DIGITAL PRINTS Converting art into fabric. Geoff Fisher visits a small Austrian company that is successfully using digital printing to create unique designs for high-end home textiles With its first major showing at last year's TIP exhibition in Brussels, a fledgling Austrian company is beginning to make its mark in the new and exciting world of digital printing. Link 7 Merchandising & Marketing also exhibited its unique look at January's Heimtextil show, using in-house design capabilities that complement the latest technology. The business was founded in 1995 by Jürgen Schmid, managing director, and Roland Amann, creative director, originally developing print programmes on a commission basis for Fussenegger, a well-established Austrian textile manufacturer. Link 7 then began working on an exclusive basis, principally for major US distributors and retailers, and counts Pier 1 Imports, Kravet, Duralee, Swavelle, Robert Allen and the Braemore division of P. Kaufmann among its customers. Conventional print converting, Link 7's "traditional" business, is based on skills in engraving and coloration, together with design capabilities that use sophisticated computer-aided design (CAD) software. Manufacture is carried out at printing mills in Austria and Israel. In December 2000, the company received a boost with the arrival of Justine Butler, a former lecturer at the London Institute's Camberwell College of Art and Design, who joined the team as designer. This coincided with the decision to invest in new digital printing technology and the purchase of a Mimaki sampling unit. In July 2002, Link 7 bought two new state-of-the-art Mimaki TXT production machines for printing small runs of 100-300 metres at a speed of 7-8 metres/hour. "We had been observing the market for about three years prior to our first investment. We noted that, after the initial high interest, the entire digital printing industry took a deep dip, but is now coming back," said Mr Schmid. "The print market in general was certainly very low for a number of years. But in the wake of fashion changes, new markets and demand for more colours and designs, print is definitely returning to the home textile industry. "With digital printing we now have the flexibility to match that of the weaver. And with our creative ability and logistical advantages we can react very quickly to market trends. The technology makes it possible to convert a design from paper to fabric with complete coloration in as little as two days." With the new equipment, Link 7 can produce exclusive and unique products in small quantities for the high-end market. Already, US companies such as Kravet, Steven Harsey and Altizer have been enthusiastic and placed orders." Prices range from US$14 a metre, for the cotton satin cloth Carola, to US$24 a metre for high-end prints on silk dupion, a type of coarse silk fabric. Link 7 concentrates on reactive printing on silk, cotton, linen and viscose cloths. Mr Amann said: "At present, we are solely using reactive inks, but we could use the full range of dyes, including pigment, acid and disperse. The next step may be printing on Trevira CS using disperse dyes." Previously, turnover for the company's print converting business was around US$600,000, but new business, mainly orders for the second half of 2002, will push this up by a further US$100,000-150,000. "The plan is definitely to put quality first, quantity second," said Mr Schmid. "Although much of our initial business in digitally printed product has been with US customers, most of the growth will be in Europe." Ms Butler added: "Our collection has more of a contemporary, eclectic look with lots of traditional and original elements. As well as some rich and opulent designs, florals are also becoming important. We have a unique, hand-painted handwriting that is based on observation. "Digital printing enables us to translate our creative power into product immediately, without compromising the number of colours or size of repeat," she said. Currently, Link 7 is working almost exclusively in home textiles and furnishing fabrics. The company has not ruled out working in fashion markets, but says it "does not want to weaken" what it is doing at present. With a small team of just five people, the company is looking for controlled growth. Its entry into digital printing "has been a real learning process, but gives us much more freedom," said Mr Schmid. He admitted it is "very probable" that Link 7 will invest in further digital printing machines some time in 2003, but will continue to concentrate on creativity and marketing. International Dyer - March 2000 Fast Forward: the new generation of production machines Fast Forward: the new generation of production machines Fast Forward: the new generation of production machines Sampling the benefits of digital printing Digital printing progress
SUPER COOL FABRICS.
Supercool capsules. At the recent Outdoor Retailer held in Salt Lake City, Utah, Cognis presented new Skintex Supercool, a technology for treating fabrics with microcapsules that provide a cooling sensation.
FABRICS FOR SURGICAL OPERATING THEATERS. Fabrics for the ergonomic high-tech operating room. Eschler Textil of Balingen, Germany, is supplying lintfree medical fabrics and non-slip floor mats for a new, experimental operating theatre. The products are being used in the Ergonomic High-Tech Operating Room (EHTOR), which is currently being constructed at the University Clinic in Tübingen, Germany. This industrysponsored, full-scale laboratory is designed to simulate a real operating room (OR) to reduce technical errors due to the interaction between machines and users.
ORGANIC POLO SHIRT The Continental Clothing Company have recently announced their intention to go fully organic. For over a decade Continental have been designing and distributing quality blank apparel, and were the early pioneers of the movement towards fitted and fashionable T-Shirts in the wholesale market. Now Continental are pioneering again, being one of the first blank apparel providers to announce their intention for their products to be completely organic.
'Organic Cotton' Continental to Help Save the Continents The Continental Clothing Company have recently announced their intention to go fully organic. For over a decade Continental have been designing and distributing quality blank apparel, and were the early pioneers of the movement towards fitted and fashionable T-Shirts in the wholesale market. Now Continental are pioneering again, being one of the first blank apparel providers to announce their intention for their products to be completely organic.
RAW COTTON 100% ORGANIC Continental have purchased 750 tonnes of ‘100% organic cotton - in conversion’, which is due to be harvested in October. From November onwards all Continental cotton garments will be 100% organic, or 100% organic - in conversion. ‘In conversion’ is a term used to denote soil which has been converted to organic practices but is within a 3 year period from its conversion, therefore trace amounts of residue from before may remain. By buying ‘in conversion’ cotton one can support farmers in the transitive process who are trying to make their produce as eco-friendly as possible. The director of Continental stated that this purchase “this is a major step towards going 100% organic – and by developing lasting & sustainable relationships with organic cotton farmers, we ensure our future supply of organic cotton in a time when demand might exceed supply”.
Equipment used for Digital Printing. Since most digital printers operate using water based inks you will need to cure your T-Shirts to achieve the best quality look on a printed garment. ‘Curing’ involves heating the T-Shirt at a prescribed temperature so that any residual water left by the digital printing process evaporates. Currently the two curing methods available are heat presses and conveyor dryers. Assuming you are not a major producer or distributor one machine will be enough to meet your needs. Most T-Shirts will need between 30-90 seconds to be cured; for an exact guide and a recommended temperature be sure to consult the requirements for the ink you are planning to use provided by the manufacturer. Though not incredibly expensive (a basic heat press starts at approximately £350) it is recommended that you don’t immediately purchase the cheapest model available. As with any new machine to be incorporated into your business you should thoroughly research the options available to you and seek out previous customers of the prospective company you are to be dealing with, after all you may need technical support. It is probably best to look at a fully digital heat press that will automatically raise itself once the pre-set time has expired to ensure against scorching the shirts. The Geo-Knight and Company’s digital heat presses (such as the DK20S, below) are usually a popular choice in this market for precisely the reasons outlined above. The chances are that if you are a screen-printer and are moving into digital printing that you already own a conveyor dryer, and this will work fine, albeit slower than a heat press. But be aware that you will have to slow your dryer belt down from its settings to allow for a full cure. A full guide to price a specifications to the most popular models of heat press can be found elsewhere on our website.Often the most prohibitive obstacles facing a small embroidery or garment printing business is the massive initial outlay on expensive technology and machinery, meaning that it is often difficult to break even in the first few years of business, let alone post a profit. The heat press manufacturer J&A International offer a unique solution which could help your fledgling business find its feet and weather the growing pains it encounters. Pioneering a rental scheme entitled ‘Seal-Deal’, J&A are offering a new 3030 heat press with a choice of heat plate sizes, all repairs and maintenance covered (excluding non-wear and tear damage), an immediate replacement in the event of malfunction and carriage of machine for a small monthly outlay. There is no long term commitment necessary with the minimum term lasting just three months and the 15×15 headed machines start at just £15 a week, with the smaller machines costing even less. Obviously this is no long-term solution but for a small businesses the inherent benefits of rental are evident, with no capital outlay and low administration costs cash flow will be greatly improved and money will be freed up for other costs. 19.jpg Another reason people may wish to join J&A’s piloting scheme is that they might wish to invest in a 3030 but would like to test the compatibility of the machine with their pre-existing framework. Adrian Apletree, the Sales & Marketing Director for J&A International told Printwear Today: “Many people use a try before you buy service, as it provides an ideal opportunity to work with the equipment and assure them that it is suitable for their needs before investing in the actual purchase. Furthermore, it provides the flexibility of being able to exchange a machine as their business and heat sealing requirements evolve.” Whether you are looking to free up cash for a start-up business or looking to test-drive a prospective heat press it looks like this innovative scheme could be extremely popular. Bookmark to: Add 'Rent-A-Press' to Del.icio.usAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to diggAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to FURLAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to blinklistAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to redditAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to Feed Me LinksAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to TechnoratiAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to Yahoo My WebAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to NewsvineAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to SocializerAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to Ma.gnoliaAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to Stumble UponAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to Google Bookmarks Add 'Rent-A-Press' to RawSugarAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to SquidooAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to SpurlAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to BlinkBitsAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to NetvouzAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to RojoAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to BlogmarksAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to ShadowsAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to SimpyAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to Co.mmentsAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to ScuttleAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to BloglinesAdd 'Rent-A-Press' to Tailrank Add comment August 10th, 2007 MHM Expanding There were three separate articles in this months ‘Printwear Today’ all documenting the Austrian screen-printing company MHM’s continued rapid expansion. Founded only 27 years ago and now with dealers in 24 countries MHM has quickly established itself as the leading manufacturer of award-winning modern, efficient and easy to use screen printing equipment. Continuing its plans to grow in the UK, MHM has recently moved its sales office to new quarters in Derby, in preparation for further expansion plans. MHM has also recently revamped its online capabilities, with a new-look website enabling potential and existing customers to obtain advice and see their screen-printing equipment in action thanks to updated video feeds. Equipment specifications and brochures are now available as downloadable content and they are the first screen printing manufacturer to actually provide software updates for their products via their website, these can be instantly accessed by any purchaser of a machine and are easy to implement. But perhaps the best indicator of MHM’s plans for dominance of the market is the hotly anticipated new digital textile printer that John Potter, of MHM Direct, promises will “revolutionise the industry”. Set to be introduced in January 2008 all that has been revealed of the system is that it has been developed with “one of the largest ink suppliers in the world”, it has been produced with high production capability in mind and that first test prints have been highly successful. synchroprint_4000.jpg MHM no doubt hopes that the new system will be as well recieved as the Synchroprint 4000 AC The innovative new system, which is fully patent protected and necessitated the production of speciality ink, is so powerful that Potter fully expects it to “reverse the trend of printed garment work going off shore”. Good times are in store for British screen printers it seems, we’ll keep you posted if any more details come to light. Bookmark to: Add 'MHM Expanding' to Del.icio.usAdd 'MHM Expanding' to diggAdd 'MHM Expanding' to FURLAdd 'MHM Expanding' to blinklistAdd 'MHM Expanding' to redditAdd 'MHM Expanding' to Feed Me LinksAdd 'MHM Expanding' to TechnoratiAdd 'MHM Expanding' to Yahoo My WebAdd 'MHM Expanding' to NewsvineAdd 'MHM Expanding' to SocializerAdd 'MHM Expanding' to Ma.gnoliaAdd 'MHM Expanding' to Stumble UponAdd 'MHM Expanding' to Google Bookmarks Add 'MHM Expanding' to RawSugarAdd 'MHM Expanding' to SquidooAdd 'MHM Expanding' to SpurlAdd 'MHM Expanding' to BlinkBitsAdd 'MHM Expanding' to NetvouzAdd 'MHM Expanding' to RojoAdd 'MHM Expanding' to BlogmarksAdd 'MHM Expanding' to ShadowsAdd 'MHM Expanding' to SimpyAdd 'MHM Expanding' to Co.mmentsAdd 'MHM Expanding' to ScuttleAdd 'MHM Expanding' to BloglinesAdd 'MHM Expanding' to Tailrank Add comment July 6th, 2007 Back in Black I commented in my blog from FESPA that the Kornit machines were giving good results on dark T-Shirts, and now I know why. kornit_931d.jpg The revolutionary 931D Kornit recently announced that they had successfully applied for a patent on their revolutionary digital printing machine, the 931D Printer will be available to all in the garment/apparel industry soon. This cutting-edge technology, in conjunction with Kornit’s specially designed digital white ink, will allow T-Shirt printers to produce sharp and vibrant colours on dark textiles using digital technology for the first time. Currently digital printing onto a dark T-Shirt generally means “washed out and faded print colours”. Thanks to advances in technology, digital (DTG) printing looks to be the way forward for T-Shirt printers. Bookmark to: Add 'Back in Black' to Del.icio.usAdd 'Back in Black' to diggAdd 'Back in Black' to FURLAdd 'Back in Black' to blinklistAdd 'Back in Black' to redditAdd 'Back in Black' to Feed Me LinksAdd 'Back in Black' to TechnoratiAdd 'Back in Black' to Yahoo My WebAdd 'Back in Black' to NewsvineAdd 'Back in Black' to SocializerAdd 'Back in Black' to Ma.gnoliaAdd 'Back in Black' to Stumble UponAdd 'Back in Black' to Google Bookmarks Add 'Back in Black' to RawSugarAdd 'Back in Black' to SquidooAdd 'Back in Black' to SpurlAdd 'Back in Black' to BlinkBitsAdd 'Back in Black' to NetvouzAdd 'Back in Black' to RojoAdd 'Back in Black' to BlogmarksAdd 'Back in Black' to ShadowsAdd 'Back in Black' to SimpyAdd 'Back in Black' to Co.mmentsAdd 'Back in Black' to ScuttleAdd 'Back in Black' to BloglinesAdd 'Back in Black' to Tailrank Add comment June 28th, 2007 Tips on buying the right heat press. There are five items you need to consider when shopping for a heat transfer press: • Ease of use • Pressure Control • Versatility • Durability • Price Ease of use When testing a heat transfer press, take note of the ease in which you can lay the garment between the plates, the amount of pressure needed to create a clean press, and how easily the machine works overall. If you choose to buy a swing-head manual press, make sure that the handle creates a tight seal on the clothing so the heat transfer is clean. The machine must be suited to the operator that is going to use it. Manual presses need a degree of physical strength and stamina particularly if they are to be used on a constant basis. If the operator can’t handle a particular press you have a problem. Pressure Control Nylon, cotton, and blended fabrics require different amounts of pressure in order to complete heat transfers. The more control you have, the more items you will be able to transfer print. A manual press relies on the strength of the operator to force the two plates of the heat press together. In contrast a Pneumatic press, relies on air pressure, supplied by an external compressor. This allows the heat press to close at the push of a button rather requiring the operator to close the press manually. This allows greater consistentcy of pressing from garment to garment. However the major benefit of the pneumatic press is greater productivity per operator. If productivity is critical to your business then chose a pneumatic press. Versatility In order to choose the right press you need to know what you are going to print. Even if most of your customers are looking for printed T-Shirts, you may need to be able to use your press in other ways. Will your customers want logos and names on bags, hats, umbrellas as well as other items. If you want this versatility, buy a press with an interchangeable bottom plate so that you can print a variety of products. Think about your business in terms of what you want to accomplish and buy a press that meets these needs. Durability There is a wide difference in heat press prices. Unfortunately, there are presses that although low in cost, do not live up to expectations. A heat press is a piece of machinery that will eventually wear out. The manufacturer, Adkins guarantees the heat platens (plates) for life. Although they expect their machines to last 5 years they don’t offer any long term guarantee or extended warrantee for their press. If you need a press in order to stay in business, choose one that will last In deciding which press to buy, it is important to consider what will happen if the press goes wrong. Is there a warranty? Are spares easily available? Who will repair the machine and how quickly? How will your business manage while the press is being repaired? You may want to consider • Demo Press – J&A offer the option to try out a press before you buy it. Effectively you are renting the machine on a 3 month contract but it gives the option of trying out the press. • Loan Presses – The Magic Touch offer a loan press in the event of a press requiring repair. However, conditions may apply to this offer. More than Just Price Better quality manual presses offer a number of benefits of cheaper rivals. They are able to achieve a far greater pressure with less force required. Cheaper presses require more force from the operator and may deliver uneven pressure. There are some good cheap heat presses around. If you are just dipping your toe in the water, a cheap press might be fine but if you are building a business it might be well worth considering a more expensive item with the backing and support of an established company behind it. 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A guide to digital (DTG) printing In the past, you may have told customers ‘no’ on small runs of multi colour print T-Shirts because it just wasn’t worth it. While the margins may have been good, the amount of time it took to prepare the equipment, set-up the design, print each color, and so on was too much. That was until digital garment printing came along. What is Digital Garment Printing? This form of printing has a few names including inkjet garment printing and direct to garment printing (DTG), but it’s all the same – an inkjet type printer that can take any design and print it out directly onto fabric. With this technology, you are able to: • Print multi-colour runs easily. • Decrease the man-power and mess of traditional screen-printing. • Be able to accept jobs that traditional screen printers would have turned away. How Digital Garment Printing Works The printing process is similar to that of a desktop inkjet printer. You place T-Shirts or other items into the tray, upload and edit your design onto the computer and press print like you would with a normal inkjet printer. After the design is printed, you have to cure it using a heat transfer press or dryer. Advantages of Digital Garment Printing The main advantages to this printing process are in the process itself. You no longer have to worry about creating screens and cleaning up afterward Being able to print garments quickly and easily saves time and money. Offering Your Customers More Even if you have been accepting smaller runs of less than fifty garments, chances are you had to charge considerably more per garment for the service. On small runs a digital garment printer is able to print T-Shirts for a fraction of the price of screen printing allowing them to take on more work and increase profit margins. What Digital Printing Can’t Do While the advantages are many, there are drawbacks including: • Unsuitable for larger runs. As each T-Shirt has to be loaded and printed individually digital printing is much slower than traditional screen printing. • Unsuitable for dark colour T-Shirts. Although print quality can be excellent, printing white ink is still a problem But as technology continues to advance, so will digital printing. Why Your Business Needs Digital Garment Printing Have you ever turned down business because of the following: • Run wasn’t large enough • Short-staffed • Amount of time didn’t justify the money earned The Bottom Line The screen-printing industry is changing. In a year or so, most promotional clothing printers will have one of these machines. If you don’t have one, then you may begin losing business to those who do. Investing in the right equipment will help you maintain customers and also allow you to take on smaller runs, which increase sales and your customer base. Return customers are vital to the success of your business. By being able to offer them the opportunity to place smaller orders, you will see more return business than ever. Bookmark to: Add 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to Del.icio.usAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to diggAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to FURLAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to blinklistAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to redditAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to Feed Me LinksAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to TechnoratiAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to Yahoo My WebAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to NewsvineAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. 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A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to ShadowsAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to SimpyAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to Co.mmentsAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to ScuttleAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to BloglinesAdd 'The future Of T-shirt printing. A guide to digital (DTG) printing' to Tailrank Add comment April 21st, 2007 Calendar September 2007 S M T W T F S « Aug 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Posts by Month * September 2007 * August 2007 * July 2007 * June 2007 * May 2007 * April 2007 * March 2007 * February 2007 * January 2007
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A MUST EQUIPMENT FOR QUALITY DIGITAL PRINTS. MHM no doubt hopes that the new system will be as well recieved as the Synchroprint 4000 AC The innovative new system, which is fully patent protected and necessitated the production of speciality ink, is so powerful that Potter fully expects it to “reverse the trend of printed garment work going off shore”. Good times are in store for British screen printers it seems, we’ll keep you posted if any more details come to light
The revolutionary 931D Kornit recently announced that they had successfully applied for a patent on their revolutionary digital printing machine, the 931D Printer will be available to all in the garment/apparel industry soon. This cutting-edge technology, in conjunction with Kornit’s specially designed digital white ink, will allow T-Shirt printers to produce sharp and vibrant colours on dark textiles using digital technology for the first time. Currently digital printing onto a dark T-Shirt generally means “washed out and faded print colours”. Thanks to advances in technology, digital (DTG) printing looks to the way forward for T-Shirt printers There are five items you need to consider when shopping for a heat transfer press:
• Ease of use • Pressure Control • Versatility • Durability • Price Ease of use When testing a heat transfer press, take note of the ease in which you can lay the garment between the plates, the amount of pressure needed to create a clean press, and how easily the machine works overall. If you choose to buy a swing-head manual press, make sure that the handle creates a tight seal on the clothing so the heat transfer is clean. The machine must be suited to the operator that is going to use it. Manual presses need a degree of physical strength and stamina particularly if they are to be used on a constant basis. If the operator can’t handle a particular press you have a problem. Pressure Control Nylon, cotton, and blended fabrics require different amounts of pressure in order to complete heat transfers. The more control you have, the more items you will be able to transfer print. A manual press relies on the strength of the operator to force the two plates of the heat press together. In contrast a Pneumatic press, relies on air pressure, supplied by an external compressor. This allows the heat press to close at the push of a button rather requiring the operator to close the press manually. This allows greater consistentcy of pressing from garment to garment. However the major benefit of the pneumatic press is greater productivity per operator. If productivity is critical to your business then chose a pneumatic press. Versatility In order to choose the right press you need to know what you are going to print. Even if most of your customers are looking for printed T-Shirts, you may need to be able to use your press in other ways. Will your customers want logos and names on bags, hats, umbrellas as well as other items. If you want this versatility, buy a press with an interchangeable bottom plate so that you can print a variety of products. Think about your business in terms of what you want to accomplish and buy a press that meets these needs. Durability There is a wide difference in heat press prices. Unfortunately, there are presses that although low in cost, do not live up to expectations. A heat press is a piece of machinery that will eventually wear out. The manufacturer, Adkins guarantees the heat platens (plates) for life. Although they expect their machines to last 5 years they don’t offer any long term guarantee or extended warrantee for their press. If you need a press in order to stay in business, choose one that will last In deciding which press to buy, it is important to consider what will happen if the press goes wrong. Is there a warranty? Are spares easily available? Who will repair the machine and how quickly? How will your business manage while the press is being repaired? You may want to consider • Demo Press – J&A offer the option to try out a press before you buy it. Effectively you are renting the machine on a 3 month contract but it gives the option of trying out the press. • Loan Presses – The Magic Touch offer a loan press in the event of a press requiring repair. However, conditions may apply to this offer. More than Just Price Better quality manual presses offer a number of benefits of cheaper rivals. They are able to achieve a far greater pressure with less force required. Cheaper presses require more force from the operator and may deliver uneven pressure. There are some good cheap heat presses around. If you are just dipping your toe in the water, a cheap press might be fine but if you are building a business it might be well worth considering a more expensive item with the backing and support of an established company behind it. In the past, you may have told customers ‘no’ on small runs of multi colour print T-Shirts because it just wasn’t worth it. While the margins may have been good, the amount of time it took to prepare the equipment, set-up the design, print each color, and so on was too much. That was until digital garment printing came along. What is Digital Garment Printing? This form of printing has a few names including inkjet garment printing and direct to garment printing (DTG), but it’s all the same – an inkjet type printer that can take any design and print it out directly onto fabric. With this technology, you are able to: • Print multi-colour runs easily. • Decrease the man-power and mess of traditional screen-printing. • Be able to accept jobs that traditional screen printers would have turned away. How Digital Garment Printing Works The printing process is similar to that of a desktop inkjet printer. You place T-Shirts or other items into the tray, upload and edit your design onto the computer and press print like you would with a normal inkjet printer. After the design is printed, you have to cure it using a heat transfer press or dryer. Advantages of Digital Garment Printing The main advantages to this printing process are in the process itself. You no longer have to worry about creating screens and cleaning up afterward Being able to print garments quickly and easily saves time and money. Offering Your Customers More Even if you have been accepting smaller runs of less than fifty garments, chances are you had to charge considerably more per garment for the service. On small runs a digital garment printer is able to print T-Shirts for a fraction of the price of screen printing allowing them to take on more work and increase profit margins. What Digital Printing Can’t Do While the advantages are many, there are drawbacks including: • Unsuitable for larger runs. As each T-Shirt has to be loaded and printed individually digital printing is much slower than traditional screen printing. • Unsuitable for dark colour T-Shirts. Although print quality can be excellent, printing white ink is still a problem But as technology continues to advance, so will digital printing. Why Your Business Needs Digital Garment Printing Have you ever turned down business because of the following: • Run wasn’t large enough • Short-staffed • Amount of time didn’t justify the money earned

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